A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Rob and Lauren Hudson: Letter of Common Ground about outcomes in capitalism and socialism

Letters for families based on the book “It Can Be Done” @studentsleadusa We write today to encourage frank discussions about outcomes in capitalism and socialism. We should recognize as common ground that these outcomes can change the arc of our society. What if we had socialized the computer and electronics industry? We would have needed a head government bureaucrat or a committee to make decisions....

Constance Alexander: Here’s to the incredible Class of 2020, may your memories live as long as you do

All over the country, teenagers are missing the pomp and circumstance associated with graduation. When schools closed in March, it was uncertain how long lockdown would last. Soon after, it became clear that staying home and social distancing were essential to prevent further onslaught of COVID-19. For the Class of 2020, school was out forever. No more homeroom, lockers, or lunch periods. Forget the...

Sarah Graman: Everyone has been touched by global pandemic and children may need some help to cope

During these unprecedented times of change and uncertainty, we need to bring our discussions and awareness about the importance of mental health to the forefront. We have all been affected by a global pandemic, and our responses are as varied as our individual selves. As such, we will carry what is now happening with us in some way for the rest of our lives. Consider the impact that some brief, but...

Bill Straub: Despite terrific failures, Trump’s possible re-election cannot really be underestimated

To quote the late, great Marvin Gaye, “What’s going on?” Before us is the president of the United States, one Donald J. Trump, aka President Extremely Stable Genius, aka President Great and Unmatched Wisdom, who has established, with no fear of contradiction, that he is not up to the task of running this great country intellectually, physically, temperamentally, emotionally, judgmentally...

Jan Hillard: The meanings of my mask, which has become an object of symbolic importance

Throughout American history, inanimate objects have taken on symbolic importance. American flag stickers, peace signs, and MAGA caps are only a few of the many symbolic objects. To display these objects or not display them carries with it indications of the owner’s politics and character. The objects can evoke prejudice, hatred, comraderies, and belonging. Today, the virus mask has become this...

Ashley McCarty: Arrest was ‘divine intervention,’ so I can say that re-entry can and does work

Homelessness and jail time were not in this perfectionist’s plans, but they are part of my story. Actually, incarceration and homelessness are part of many other individual’s stories as well. Directly after graduating college I was employed as a pharmaceutical sales representative and, due to my performance with the business community, rose to a top-five ranking in sales out of 10,000 employees...

Rob and Lauren Hudson: Letter of Common Ground about youth and free enterprise

Letters for families based on the book “It Can Be Done” @studentsleadusa We write to address the disconnect between societal benefits of free enterprise and how a sizeable portion of young Americans appear to negatively view our economic system. Meanwhile, these same young Americans witnessed and participated in a technological revolution delivered to us by free enterprise. Many of our system’s...

Billy Reed: The Turtle Derby has a nice, slow ring to it — how about another with a political twist?

In my 56 years on the Kentucky Derby trail, I had never heard the Turtle Derby story. It sounds preposterous, I know, but it is true. On May 9, 1945, turtles raced in Louisville instead of horses. I swear I am not making this up. At the first of that year, World War II still was raging and the government canceled horse racing. It looked as if the Derby would be canceled for the first time since the...

Al Cross: McConnell risks riling public employees with pension, bankruptcy remarks

Ever since he became leader of Republicans in the U.S. Senate, Mitch McConnell has used that post as his most consistent argument to Kentucky voters that they should re-elect him, because it lets the state “punch above our weight” to get federal favors. It’s been an effective pitch in his two re-election campaigns since, and it has the added advantage of being true: Among the states, Kentucky...

John Schaaf: McConnell’s talk of state bankruptcy is strange, and his timing of announcement is peculiar

In a strange move, Sen. Mitch McConnell recently announced he favors “allowing states to use the bankruptcy route,” so he’s pushing an idea that would require states to raise taxes and sell off assets such as the Kentucky State Parks. Sen. McConnell’s announcement is peculiar because of its timing and because of the chaos that would result if a state declared it could not pay its bills. Luckily,...

Bill Straub: Mitch McConnell, known for putting party before country, does it again over ‘blue state bailouts’

In 1975, facing an excruciating financial crisis, the City of New York under Democratic Mayor Abraham Beame, looking bankruptcy squarely in the eye, went hat-in-hand to President Gerald Ford seeking some sort of bail-out to help clear the debt. Ford, a Republican, told Beame and the five boroughs to take a hike, leading the New York Daily News to print one of the most renowned front-page headlines...

Commentary: Cash payments give Americans crucial economic support; it can combat climate change too

By Mark Reynolds and Vasudha Deshpande Citizens’ Climate Lobby COVID-19 is first and foremost a public health crisis, but as it has unfolded, it has rippled out into an economic crisis, too. The stock market has been volatile, lurching in ways we haven’t seen since the 2008 recession. Businesses are closing their doors as millions stay home to try to limit the spread of the virus. In our community,...

Commentary: Caregiving in the era of COVID-19, no ordinary time; some recommendations

By Charlotte Whittaker and Ron Bridges AARP 

Even in ordinary times, the 630,000 of unpaid family caregivers in Kentucky face a daunting set of daily tasks. Oftentimes with little or no training, they may be responsible for wound care, tube feedings, dressing, managing the finances and medical bills of their loved ones, transportation and more. Of course, these are no ordinary times. The coronavirus...

Rob and Lauren Hudson: Letter of Common Ground about compelling support for free enterprise

Letters for families based on the book “It Can Be Done” @studentsleadusa We write today to present three compelling points favoring capitalism, all of which can serve as truthful, productive common ground. People who would prefer a different economic system often cite some negatives about these points. However, their compelling positives should encourage us to preserve free enterprise as the foundation...

Jan Hillard: Making sense of COVID-19 — the two faces of public opinion which vary dramatically

There are two faces of public opinion surrounding COVID-19. One face represents the roughly 75% of the public who support science, believe that COVID 19 requires widespread caution, and trusts the government’s response. This is the face of science and reason. The other face represents 25% of the public who does not believe the scientific facts about COVID 19 and are suspicious of government’s...