A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Janie Heath: It’s time for bold steps to keep e-cigarettes out of the hands of kids

On June 17, CVS Health committed to overturning youth e-cigarette use at a whole new level: The retail and health care giant will dedicate $10 million for strategies to prevent e-cigarette use and to educate our children about the danger. This announcement follows a report released by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) earlier this year that stated that more than 1,550 warning letters and...

Beth Davisson: Employers have important role in combatting Kentucky’s opioid epidemic

Kentucky employers have a growing front-line awareness of the devastating impact the opioid epidemic is having on our state. They know that this epidemic is more than a public health issue. It is also a serious workforce issue that must be addressed – with employers playing a key role – if they are going to meet their challenges of finding and retaining workers. As Jonathan Copley, CEO of Aetna...

Lauren and Rob Hudson: Exceptionalism through respecting faith, a positive message for youth

Columns for families based on the book “It Can Be Done” @studentsleadusa Every thoughtful person knows religion raises some of life’s biggest questions. Should a person believe in a higher, godly power? If so, is that godly power good, bad, or maybe even a little of both? What type of religion, if any, should a person practice? The purpose of this column is not to say which religious faith,...

Letter to the Editor: Celebrate our collective progress in postsecondary education, despite budget cuts

In Northern Kentucky and across the state, our public colleges and universities are building momentum on key goals, demonstrating a shared commitment to help more students stay in college and graduate. Click image to see full report It’s an impressive feat considering that the public campuses have been cut nearly $223 million in state General Fund appropriations since the recession. As members of...

Richard Nelson: Remembering our nation’s 243rd birthday and the soul-stirring 56 words that define us

Just a few days ago I was in Washington D.C. where I visited the National Archives and saw the Declaration of Independence. It was featured alongside the U.S. Constitution and other historical documents in the dimly lit rotunda. It was amazing to see our founding documents in person. Yet I had trouble deciphering the words. Centuries had taken their toll on the parchment and the ink was fading. I couldn’t...

Al Cross: Beshear, Bevin, Alvarado finagle with the facts, but everyone wants their own version of truth

People and politicians have always wanted their own versions of the truth, facts and science be damned, but the modern media environment has made it easier to do that – and to fool others into mistaken belief. Witness the Kentucky governor’s race. When Attorney General Andy Beshear, who is the antithesis of nimble, went off-script June 26 and called his Democratic candidacy “an opportunity ....

Bill Straub: Civics lesson for Independence Day and the most joyful event of them all — press bashing

Tis the 4th of July, time for baseball, firecrackers, backyard barbeques and the most joyful event of them all, press bashing. As usual, it’s the president of the United States, Extremely Stable Genius, leading this Independence Day parade, asserting reports that his administration dropped plans to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census form are “FAKE!” Forget for a moment that the...

Chris Burns: Independence Day ‘With Malice Toward None, with Charity for All’ is worth celebrating

Today many of us will be watching or participating in the Independence Day parades, celebrating the very document that was signed by our country’s founders 243 years ago. That single document, the Declaration of Independence, gave each one of us the freedom to live in this great region.  Over two centuries later, Independence Day remains a high point in a region where hundreds of residents of all...

John Schaaf: U.S. Court of Appeals upholds state ethics law, sends strong signal to states, Congress

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit recently put its stamp of approval on Kentucky’s legislative ethics law, sending a clear signal for strong public ethics laws across the nation. Kentucky’s ethics law was challenged in a lawsuit filed by John Schickel, a state senator from Boone County. In his lawsuit, Schickel claimed he has a right under the U.S. Constitution to accept lobbyist-funded...

Buck Blodgett: Is it time to treat violence against women as a national emergency?

Each day in the United States women are victims of all types of violence at the hands of men – murder, domestic abuse, sexual assault – yet too often as a nation, we take little or no notice. But on occasion, for some of us, the violence hits home and can no longer be ignored. My daughter, Jessie, was 19 when she was raped and murdered in our home by a friend. Her death left me stunned, shocked...

Lauren and Rob Hudson: Positive messages for America’s youth — our exceptionalism through hope

Columns for families based on the book It Can Be Done @studentsleadusa Hope can serve as an antidote for negative people and negative social media. In America, we have solid reasons to be hopeful about the future. Just look at our low unemployment and our economy’s strong growth. Americans have opportunities to earn on the job, by owning and selling property, including stocks in companies, or...

Commentary: If enacted, Governor’s pension plan would further undermine an already broken system

By Rep. Joe Graviss and Rep. Buddy Wheatley With Governor Bevin expected to call a special legislative session soon to pass his public pension plan, we are reminded of Henry Ford, who famously said his customers could have cars painted “any color, so long as it’s black.” For weeks now, the debate has focused solely on the governor’s bill and a few tweaks he’s made. Legislators have been told...

Neal Moser: Congress must protect Kentucky patients from surprise medical care bills

Protecting patients is a critical component of my work as a physician. But sometimes, we can’t protect them when it comes to the financial fallout of the medical care they require. Far too often, my patients are hit with large medical bills that they don’t expect, especially if they receive emergency treatment from an out-of-network physician or in an out-of-network facility. When this happens,...

Constance Alexander: Genetic eye disorder leads biologist to alternative ways to see the world

When he was a farm boy growing up in rural Iowa, John Pollpeter was like most kids. He played Little League baseball and golf and was a mid-halfback in football. And living close to the Mississippi River provided adventures in the great outdoors. He was fascinated by animals, mammals especially, and that turned into a lifelong passion. Around the time he was supposed to get his driver’s license,...

Bill Straub: McConnell turning a blind eye to Russian interference in elections goes beyond party loyalty

His report passed on charging President Extremely Stable Genius with illicitly coordinating with Russia on the 2020 presidential election and left the question of obstruction of justice to other authorities, but Robert Mueller, the special counsel responsible for diving into the whole sordid mess, made one thing perfectly clear – Russia “launched a concerted attack on our political system’’...