A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Richard Nelson: Will Kentucky’s legislature double down on video gambling?

The Kentucky Supreme Court denied the Horse Racing industry’s appeal to allow historical horse racing, aka video slot machines, at their six gambling venues across the Commonwealth. As a result, the Kentucky state legislature is being pressured to change the definition of parimutuel so that video slot machines can remain. Gambling lobbyists are ratcheting up their efforts by targeting lawmakers...

Whitney Austin: Keeping guns from those in crisis is as important as protecting the right to ownership

Not everyone gets the chance to look death in the face and come out on the other side with an opportunity to make an impact and save lives. But on September 6, 2018, the opportunity found me when twelve bullets ripped through my body. Thanks to the bravery of the Cincinnati Police Department, the Cincinnati Medical Center, and countless first responders, I survived and was reunited with my precious...

Joe Heil: Saluting foresight of Cold Spring, Campbell County leaders for protecting a valuable asset

Nearly 60 years ago, government and business leaders from the City of Cold Spring and Campbell County showed tremendous foresight in charting a future path of prosperity for one of the most desirable parcels of property in the region. The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) organization that sits along Alexandria Pike has been a tremendous asset to Cold Spring and a great neighbor to my restaurant, which...

Commentary: A call to action — save historical horse racing and the health of state’s racing and breeding

By Doug Cauthen and Elisabeth Jensen Kentucky Equine Education Project We believe and assume that most people reading this letter know that Historical Horse Racing (HHR) has been in the news a lot lately. But to quickly summarize, the KY Supreme Court officially ruled that it would not rehear the case where it ruled, in principle, that at least certain HHR machines could not continue UNLESS the Kentucky...

Constance Alexander: Pandemic leaves legacy of loose ends and unanswered questions

The only photo we have of my maternal grandparents is typical of the Victorian era. Sitting ramrod straight in an ornately carved chair, my grandfather, Sydney John Kelly, is decked out in his Navy uniform. My grandmother stands beside him, solemn and stalwart, her right hand on his shoulder. Her hat features a stylish tilt to the brim, and she wears a brooch on the lapel of her fitted coat. In her...

Commentary: General Assembly session offers chance to explore new avenues for criminal justice

The year 2020 was a trying time for the Commonwealth. COVID-19 forced us to reconsider what was important and adjust how we conduct our daily affairs. In our justice system, it meant keeping guards and people in incarceration safe by addressing the endemic overcrowding in Kentucky, where we sadly have the dubious distinction of having the seventh highest incarceration rate in the nation. Our executive...

Dale Romans: Historical horse racing is a game-changer that is good for Kentucky

As a second-generation horse trainer and Kentuckian, my entire life has been spent in Thoroughbred racing. I’ve seen Kentucky racing at its finest, and I’ve seen how quickly out-of-state competition can render us increasingly irrelevant. Right now Kentucky is at the top. But it doesn’t have to stay that way. I currently have 50 employees and do business with more than 100 vendors in Kentucky...

Bill Straub: There are lies, real lies, silent lies, hallucinations and fabrications — and Rand Paul

It is obvious that the Republican Party has been stricken with a strange and exotic disease that leads to hallucinations about rigged elections and the chills over a presidential impeachment. The symptoms indicate a really bad case of something called Rand Paul. It is past time for the voters of Kentucky to come to grips with the fact that it has not once, but twice, dispatched a crackpot to the United...

Michael Keck: New Kentucky university aims to be beacon for critical thinking and civil discourse

“…[W]ithout a vibrant commitment to free and open inquiry, a university ceases to be a university.”
 
This commonsense — yet sadly and vexingly controversial — statement is a key tenet of the University of Chicago’s 2014 Report of the Committee on Freedom of Expression, commonly known as the “Chicago Statement.”
 Michael Keck The fact that, to date, fewer than 80 of the United...

Letter to the Editor: Margot Seidel says speak for those who can’t speak for themselves

COVID-19 is not, and has never been, the great equalizer. Though all of our lives are forever changed by this pandemic, it has been anything but a shared experience. This virus and the socioeconomic havoc it wreaks disproportionately affect those who are already the most vulnerable and disadvantaged. As Ohio enters Phase 1B of vaccine administration, we could all afford to take a moment to consider...

Commentary: When worst of COVID is behind us, will you be ready when employers start hiring again?

By KCTCS college presidents   In a few months, we hope the worst of COVID-19 is behind us. When that happens, the economy will improve, and employers will start hiring again. A big question is: Will they be able to find a trained and skilled workforce to fit the many open jobs they’ll have? The answer is: Yes, if Kentuckians seek training from one of the 16 colleges of the Kentucky Community and...

Jim Waters: New progressive pension plan proposed by Rep. Massey is positive for future teachers

In one sense, Rep. Ed Massey’s bill to create a new tier within the Teachers’ Retirement System (TRS) represents a substantial change in Kentucky’s pension system – but only for new teachers.   In another real and important way during this time of political upheaval, House Bill 258 represents no change at all – at least not for any retiree or teacher already enrolled in the $20 billion pension...

Jason Bailey: General Assembly should strengthen recovery by approving much-needed relief

The 2021 Kentucky General Assembly will reconvene in early February, and the remaining piece of essential business is agreement on a new state budget. The legislature faces a choice: deploy extra resources to build a bridge to the other side of this crisis, or pursue austerity and leave us facing a slower and more treacherous recovery. Kentucky’s opportunities in this budget are surprising. Given...

Ashli Watts: Kentuckians must face some harsh realities if we are to achieve racial equity

Although 2020 was the most difficult year many have ever experienced, it is safe to say that many lessons were learned throughout the course of such a challenging year. As we reflect over the last twelve months, Americans have endured a global pandemic, economic turmoil, political divisiveness, and racial unrest. As overwhelming as all of this can seem, I have learned that some of life’s biggest...

Al Cross: McConnell makes play to sideline Trump as he has chance to remake how he’ll be remembered

“There is a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the flood leads on to fortune. . . . On such a full sea are we now afloat.” – Brutus to Cassius, Julius Caesar, Act 4 The last time I talked with Mitch McConnell, I suggested that our next conversation be about the future of the Republican Party (after Donald Trump). I didn’t use the last three words, since it was just before the election. He...