A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Advancing Equity: Racism, like child abuse, means all of us must take responsibility for ending it

Part of a series by NKY’s nonprofits who stand together against racism and any acts that dehumanize people. By Jane Hermes Family Nurturing Center Difficult subjects. These days, there are a lot of them. Families avoid talking about politics because of high passions and sharp divisions. We’re all experiencing pandemic fatigue, and once-casual references to personal activities – dinners with...

Aaron Thompson: As fall semester begins statewide, student responsibility crucial to campus health

As the fall semester kicks off at colleges and universities across Kentucky, there is still much uncertainty. The spread of the virus is accelerating at exactly the wrong moment, threatening to undo months of planning. The decision to resume in-person operations is truly a Sophie’s choice. There is no perfect solution, and for every person happy with the decision, someone else is not. As president...

Commentary: Legislators look to address COVID-19 liability concerns during 2021 regular session

By Rep. Regina Huff, Rep. Derek Lewis, Rep. Chad McCoy, and Rep. Steve Sheldon Over the past five months, hundreds of businesses, churches, schools, nonprofits, and other important institutions across our state have voiced concern that they may be sued despite making good-faith effort to follow COVID-19 safety guidelines. Frankly, given the tremendous uncertainty about the virus and what is expected...

Bill Straub: Truth or lie? Well, it’s probably a lie if the President says it — and James Comer believes

President Donald J. Trump, aka President Extremely Stable Genius, aka President Great and Unmatched Wisdom, is notorious for anyone of a million sins. But perhaps the man’s most infamous character flaw is his propensity to prefer climbing up a tree to tell a lie over standing on the ground to tell the truth. Even his most avid supporters – and don’t kid yourself, there’s still plenty of them...

Mark Dimondstein: Fight for Post Office far from over but reversal of DeJoy’s policies are a good start

The members of the American Postal Workers Union applaud the efforts of postal customers who, along with civil rights and veterans organizations, other labor unions, community groups, and elected officials, pushed back against newly implemented policies instituted by Postmaster General Louis DeJoy. They fought against those measures that were designed to delay mail by canceling overtime, limiting...

Richard Nelson: Kentucky Supreme Court hears oral arguments on instant racing legality — should say no

The Kentucky Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the legality of instant racing devices last week. Proponents argue they’re simply another way for patrons to bet on horses and provide a new revenue stream to the state. Opponents say they’re illegal video slot machines designed to separate players from their cash as quickly as possible. The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission (HRC) authorized...

Commentary: Sheila Mason’s 50-year career at the State Capitol is worthy of recognition

By Senate President Robert Stivers, House Speaker David Osborne, Senate Minority Floor Leader Morgan McGarvey and House Minority Floor Leader Joni L. Jenkins When General Assembly interns show up for their first day at the State Capitol, one of the first things they learn is that the well-being of our representative democracy depends on upholding the people’s trust in their government. Fortunately,...

Eric Friedlander: Vigilance, protective measures will unite Kentuckians to be ‘stronger than opioids’

“Together, we are stronger than opioids.” It’s a uniting mantra we use as part of the Kentucky Opioid Response Effort to guide our purpose, affirm our hope and call upon our greatest asset in this Commonwealth: one another. Together, we are building a system of care to reduce harms associated with opioid use and prevent misuse, connect more people with evidence-based treatment, including...

Bill Carstanjen: Kentucky Derby tradition will move forward safely, responsibly with limited fans on site

On September 5th, in a little less than a month, we will hold the 146th consecutive running of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs Racetrack. While this will be the first time since the waning days of World War II in 1945 that we have not run the race on the first Saturday in May, it was not a hard decision to postpone the event. The global pandemic arrived with a fury and caused all of us to make...

Al Cross: McConnell, his power tested, needs a deal at this critical time for him and the nation

The last two times Kentuckians have re-elected Mitch McConnell to the U.S. Senate, his best logical argument has been his growing power: as minority leader in 2008, and would-be majority leader in 2014, why should a state with many needs give up such influence? Voters say it again and again. For most of his current campaign, McConnell has made a similar pitch, overtly in ads and subtly in “earned...

Bill Straub: Where is the Senate traditionalist now? Could he be the Emperor with no Clothes?

After what seems like centuries masquerading as the grand wizard of the U.S. Senate, a man whose ingenious strategies and maneuvers left the likes of Daniel Webster and Lyndon Baines Johnson disheveled in his imperial wake, Senate Republican Leader Mitch “Root-‘n-Branch’’ McConnell has been revealed for what he really is – a gutless wonder. He is the emperor with no clothes. He is, as the...

Patti Gleason: Quality early childhood education is at center stage — and funding has to be more than a band-aid

Childcare, Early Learning, Early Childhood Education or the dirty word we never like to hear…..Daycare, whatever you like to call it I have devoted 39 years fighting to make it better. I could not have chosen a more rewarding career, despite the great frustration that comes with providing a service families desperately need but often cannot afford. The coronavirus pandemic has demonstrated that our...

Nick Covault: Kentucky Governor’s School for the Arts, a unique state treasure, invites input

The Governor’s School for the Arts (GSA) is a unique treasure. Very few states offer a program that convenes young artists for college-level instruction and community building with peers who share their passion for creativity. In fact, GSA is arguably the only program of its kind in the country that is offered tuition-free to Kentucky students. Alumni of the program receive access to lifelong mentorships,...

Billy Reed: Look for Billy’s cutout in the Reds stands and don’t play golf with Trump (integrity matters)

I freely admit that I have enjoyed watching the Cincinnati Reds on TV, even though I seriously doubt if major-league baseball will be able to continue dodging the Coronavirus pandemic that has shut down so many things we love. For example, the Louisville Bats canceled the entire season months ago. They’re the Reds’ Class AAA farm team, and I miss going to Slugger Field on the banks of the Ohio...

Col Owens: Of course we can — we must search our souls if we really mean to find the end to racism

Distinguishing between races began in America in 1619, with the importation of Africans as slaves. The American economy was built on that system and it survived for 250 years. While slavery was dominant in the South, all of America benefited from it, with the interdependency of the economy. The Civil War and amendments to the Constitution freed the slaves. And under Lincoln, Reconstruction promised...