A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Jesse Brewer: Catastrophe on many levels, students’ DC experience shows need to wait for all facts

The recent events that unfolded this past weekend in Washington D.C., involving students from Covington Catholic High School, are nothing short of a catastrophe on many levels. Clearly, we are a nation divided by beliefs and politics, and its clear that some people will try to destroy anyone and anything that they perceive to be in their way if it will further their agenda and cause, no matter the...

David Holthaus: Beyond Civility, Covington Catholic incident in D.C. presents more than a teaching moment

For nearly a hundred years, Covington Catholic High School has nurtured its reputation as a place where young men can be taught in the ways of the Catholic faith. Unfortunately, that reputation is in danger of being destroyed because of an afternoon of student antics during a school field trip, offensive misbehavior that was captured in multiple videos and widely shared via social media. And now the...

Aaron Thompson: Setbacks are inevitable, but on this Martin Luther King Day, let us celebrate progress

If Martin Luther King Jr. were alive today, he would have just celebrated his 90th birthday. Inevitably, I find myself wondering how Dr. King would rate America’s progress in achieving social and racial justice. The election of our first black president in 2008 was a watershed event that reminded us of just how far we’ve come since the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which abolished Jim Crow laws that...

Amy Bensenhaver: Legislators, public abandoned any pretense of compliance with open meetings

Amidst the usual controversies that attend the opening days of a legislative session, the first week of the 2019 Kentucky General Assembly raised a singular question unrelated to the weighty business at hand: When did the legislature abandon any pretense of compliance with the open meetings laws and when did Kentuckians abandon any expectation of compliance? As the week began, we learned of an emergency...

Mayor Joe Meyer: City is a place of opportunity for all; disturbing video does not reflect our values

Two days before the holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., an intense discussion took place following breakfast at a Catholic church in Covington’s urban core.   The crowd listened as five courageous young women talked candidly about growing up in Northern Kentucky being, as it were, a bi-racial student in high school, an African-American of Jewish faith, an African-American of Muslim faith,...

Retired Justice Daniel Venters: The Governor’s verbal attacks on the courts are wrong — and ‘fake news’

Governor Bevin responded to the Kentucky Supreme Court’s recent unanimous opinion on the 2018 pension reform bill by accusing all seven Justices of being politically-motivated “activist judges” who defied the Rule of Law in an “unprecedented power grab.” He said the Court’s opinion was “screwing Kentucky.” As the Supreme Court Justice who wrote that opinion, and as a Republican who...

Al Cross: Bevin’s chances for re-election, if he runs, are better than you think, popularity notwithstanding

FRANKFORT, Ky. – If Gov. Matt Bevin really does run for re-election, as he keeps saying he will, and as I believe he will, what chance does he have of winning? Better than you might think. Yes, he may be America’s most unpopular governor. In the latest Morning Consult state-by-state poll, for the last quarter of 2018, his approval rating was 34 percent and his disapproval was 51 percent. (Four...

Richard Nelson: Whether or not life is found on Mars, it is found in the tiniest heartbeat of a human being

BBC Science Correspondent Jonathan Amos recently asked, “What chance has NASA of finding life on Mars?” He’s referring to the Mars 2020 mission whose purpose is “to determine if life ever existed on Mars.” Scientists studying the geography of Mars believe there’s evidence of a lake, now dried up, called Jezero Crater. It’s a 28-mile geologically rich terrain...

Bill Straub: Character is indispensable, character matters, character first; did someone say ‘character’?

Apparently a person’s character doesn’t amount to a hill of beans in Sen. Rand Paul’s world. The Bowling Green Republican, who once referred to President Trump (YIKES!) as “a delusional narcissist and an orange-faced windbag,’’ has somehow emerged as the most intense defender of said orange-faced windbag in the upper chamber, going so far as to wage attacks on those who might suggest that...

Catrina Bowman-Thomas: Security, we can say it and spell it — but then the devil is in the priorities

se·cu·ri·ty (səˈkyo͝orədē) 1. the state of being free from danger or threat. As we head into another week of the government shutdown, I have spent a lot of time thinking about the word security and grappling with what it means — to me, to my family, to the families and communities we serve, and to our country. Security is essential in life. We all work to provide a home that is safe and...

Hank Phillips: State riding a big tourism wave, creating major economic impact across the state

Kentucky is riding a tourism wave that promises to grow, adding to its already impressive contributions to the state’s economy.   Tourism-related businesses and convention bureaus across the Commonwealth work tirelessly to cement Kentucky’s name in the tourism industry. And the results speak for themselves.   The success of  Kentucky Tourism Commissioner Kristen Branscum and other tourism and...

Wil Schroder: Reporting on happenings in first week of 153rd Kentucky General Assembly

The 153rd regular session of the Kentucky General Assembly convened last week with more than 150 profiled bills awaiting consideration. With only 30 working days to accomplish so much, I’m proud to say the Kentucky Senate went right to work. We had a productive first week in Frankfort and left in good spirits about what is to come this session. The Senate’s activity involved some procedural measures....

Kristin Baldwin: NKY has dismal voter turnout; what to do to encourage participation, stronger voice?

Kentucky legislators elected in the 2018 midterm elections have taken office, ready to get to work on setting policy at the local, state and federal levels. As they begin to set the agenda for what they want to accomplish, will Northern Kentucky be a focus for them? We have a concern that the answer is likely not. Why? Northern Kentucky has one of the lowest voter turnouts in the Commonwealth, with...

Amye Bensenhaver: Some things shouldn’t change; ‘selective disclosure’ does not apply to open records

A bedrock principle of the open records law has recently come under fire. BR 821, pre-filed by Danny Carroll (R-Paducah), was quickly withdrawn after access advocates vociferously criticized the bill. Among other offensive proposals, the bill would permit courts to impose agency attorneys’ fees on open records requesters in cases in which the court found the requesters’ purpose “inproper.”...

Mark Glasper: Stop pharmacy benefits managers from fleecing Kentuckians – eliminate middlemen

Thanks to new federal and state laws, including Rep. Michael Meredith’s House Bill 463 from 2018, your pharmacist can finally inform you when the real price of your medicine is less than the copayment charged by your insurer. This much-needed transparency means consumers will finally be aware of something that happens far more often than they know.   But this is only the tip of the iceberg when...