A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Dr. Ty Sullivan: Don’t let COVID-19 prevent your child’s annual doctor visit; check immunizations

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the way of life in Kentucky, our country and across the world. In recent months, stay-at-home orders, mask-wearing and social distancing measures have created a “new normal,” and all of us have put activities on hold to reduce the spread of the virus. But one activity that you should not put on hold is a child’s annual doctor visit. With schools back in session...

Rachel Roberts: Today is Suicide Prevention Day — we have a lot more to do to prioritize mental health

The rise of COVID-19 has understandably re-focused our attention on healthcare access and inequities. One component that hasn’t gotten as much attention, but should, is access to mental healthcare. We’re in a moment where more of us than ever before could benefit from having an established relationship with a qualified provider. 
Although we have seen sustained success in the fields of mental...

Bill Straub: Overseeing destruction of the planet, president declares he is great environmentalist

With all the attention being afforded his derisive comments aimed at military personnel, his abject failure to address the COVID-19 crisis, the ever-increasing volume of his racist dog whistling and, well, his general imbecility, little notice is being given to President Donald J. Trump as he oversees the destruction of the planet. Fires are raging in California, hurricanes are popping up like bubbles...

A personal journey through prostate cancer, which needs as much a spotlight as breast cancer in women

By Steve Ranson Kentucky Health News Prostate cancer is to men as breast cancer is to women. The second-leading cause of cancer deaths in men comes from a small gland located between the bladder and the penis. If not monitored or treated, prostate can be a killer. Likewise, the No. 2 cause of cancer deaths in women is breast cancer. So what’s the difference? Over the years, more awareness has been...

Edward Tonini: Communities battle urgent problem worsened by pandemic — healthy food access

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted our nation in unprecedented and profound ways. Our nation’s vulnerable children are particularly compromised. Within their communities, they have to battle an urgent problem worsened by this pandemic: food access. Simply put, with schools closed, it is significantly more difficult for children to access the healthy foods they need. However, there are tools the federal...

John Schickel: Enjoy happy Labor Day celebrating those who keep economy moving, society strong

On Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, America held its first Labor Day celebration. In 1894, then-President Grover Cleveland officially made Labor Day a national holiday. Since that time, America has recognized the first Monday in September to celebrate the people who keep our economy moving and society strong—the American worker. 2020 has brought a greater appreciation for our workforce....

Advancing Equality: Can we talk? Stand united to advance racial equity and break down barriers

Part of a series by NKY’s nonprofits who stand together against racism and any acts that dehumanize people. Can We Talk? We stand united to advance racial equity this statement drives the discussions of our group of Northern Kentucky nonprofits seeking to ensure social justice. This group, comprised of more than 25 nonprofit agencies based in Campbell, Kenton, and Boone Counties, has been meeting...

Adrienne Bush: Congress can help communities invite new housing of all types by passing YIMBY Act

As the United States Congress returns to Washington this week, our Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has an opportunity to advance sensible, meaningful legislation that acknowledges housing affordability and availability as central to economic recovery, social equity, and a more stable, prosperous life for every American. From 2000–2015, the country built 7.3 million fewer homes than were needed...

Nicholas Wyman: COVID-19 provides an opportunity to re-imagine the workplace in the Bluegrass State

Kentucky was coming off historic lows in unemployment, hovering around 4%, when the pandemic struck, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Record high unemployment sent that figure surging to 16.6% in April; then it normalized to just 4.3% (that same as 82,714 jobless). Then, when COVID-19 rose again as of August 27, the Bluegrass spiked again approaching 48,000 cases. As we await this month’s...

Bill Straub: ‘The time for change is now,’ and yes the fine young men of UK are talking about racism

Kentucky has a problem. It’s a problem that devastates the entire nation, for sure, and the Bluegrass is no exception. It came to the forefront this week when members of the University of Kentucky basketball team, along with coach John Calipari, appeared in a two-minute video pleading with fans and foes alike to join them in opposing the sin of racial injustice. It’s an issue that is finally receiving...

Constance Alexander: With so much division in our society today, can poetry really unite us?

Probably not but it gives you something to think about. Just a day ago I asked Facebook friends to name their favorite poems. They swarmed in like horseflies — agile, biting, high on sweet nectar of the madness we call poetry Poetry Unites America, an unscripted documentary film series, is based on the premise that sharing the poetry we love most can bring us together in these days of political,...

Col Owens: Teaching is an investment in the future and that’s why I’m teaching poverty law

I returned to teaching a couple of weeks ago. I teach a course in Poverty Law at NKU’s Chase Law College as an adjunct professor. Many people ask me what poverty law is. I answer that it’s the study of how the law impacts and intersects with poor people – for better or worse. It happens in virtually every area of life – housing, health, employment, public benefits, family, education,...

Jesse Brewer: Bureaucratic executive mandates are putting our kids’ mental health in jeopardy

It seems more and more things are being taken away from our kids due to the COVID-19 pandemic. First it was their school, switching them from in person to online, then it was their summer camps and now youth sports are under attack as we speak. In Northern Kentucky, the NKYFL (Northern Kentucky Youth Football League) canceled it is 2020 season, and many more around the state are following suit. I’m...

Commentary: Bipartisan election agreement puts Kentuckians’ health first for this November

By Gov. Andy Beshear and Secretary of State Michael Adams In the midst of a global health pandemic caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19), as a Democratic Governor and a Republican Secretary of State we have proven that we can put partisanship aside to make our elections safer for our people. We know that working across the aisle to reach a bipartisan agreement, regardless of where you live from Washington,...

Commentary: With support, Kentucky’s farmers can deliver climate solutions

By Mark Reynolds and Vasudha Deshpande Citizens’ Climate Lobby In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, uncertainty was everywhere. Would the virus spread, and where? What did this mean for day-to-day life? Pretty quickly, that uncertainty showed up at the grocery store. We remember seeing partially empty shelves as people panicked and stocked up on food. Vasudha Deshpande Today, plenty of...