A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Constance Alexander: Forget your password — and then try to remember, if you can, your favorite teacher

You know the routine. You forgot your password, and you didn’t write it down because you were sure you’d never forget it. Without a password manager to secure your digital life, you finally surrender, call the 800 number, and subject yourself to answering your very own magic questions to establish your identity so you can get a new password.  Answering question #1 is easy. #2, a piece of cake....

Letter to Editor: Schalck Family says Strep infection caused death of Lilliana, a Highlands cheerleader

We would first like to express our utmost appreciation for the outpouring of love and support from her friends, teachers, coaches, and administrators at Highlands Middle and High Schools, her extended family at Premier Athletics, plus the entire cheer community across this whole country, and most of all the good people of Fort Thomas. We are so thankful, and honestly overwhelmed, by those that have...

Al Cross: Three Democrats for governor make their cases in first contested primary race since 2007

The shape of the May 21 Democratic primary for governor became clearer Wednesday night as the three major candidates held their first debate. Attorney General Andy Beshear’s front-runner status was confirmed by the criticism he got from former state Auditor Adam Edelen, during and after the hour-long encounter. State House Minority Leader Rocky Adkins, the taller, older guy standing between the other...

Patricia Fox: Reverence for the past should include preservation of landmarks ravaged by time

Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France experienced a devastating fire on April 15, most likely as the result of a construction accident. Fox Earlier in March, three historic African American churches in St Landry Parish, Louisiana also experienced demoralizing fires, but these were the result of suspected hate crimes. All of these fires have aroused the support of the world-wide community. Donations...

Bill Straub: Lear on Twitter and other things we are witnessing in the wake of the Mueller report

John Leroy Maxwell authored a poem, later set to music, about a drunken degenerate who passes out in the gutter. He is soon joined in his idyll by a roaming pig. A woman passing nearby witnessed this slovenly scene and sniffed that you can tell a man “by the company he chooses.” “And the pig got up, and slowly walked away,’’ Maxwell wrote. Given that, it appears a whole passel of Kentucky...

Melissa Martin: Summer is a time for children to have fun — and we need to be sure they are safe

Summer is a season for running in the yard, swimming, and playing in a tree house. But for some children summer becomes a dangerous or deadly season. Lawn Mower Safety Data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission shows that when visits to doctors’ offices and clinics are included, more than 17,000 children and teens are treated for lawn mower injuries each year, according to the American...

Stuart Sanders: In light of Notre Dame fire, Kentucky needs to ensure preservation of its treasures

When Notre Dame Cathedral burned on April 15, people across the world mourned the damage. They shared family photographs taken at the cathedral, worried about artifacts housed within the church and expressed concern about the building’s stained glass windows. Sanders While we mourn the fire because of the cathedral’s religious and cultural significance, we also connect to the building because of...

Commentary: Earth Day’s movement for healthy environment continues with call to action on climate

By Mark Reynolds, Jim Vogt and Doug Bell As Americans observe Earth Day (April 22), let’s take a moment to reflect on the power of the grassroots movement behind that first celebration in 1970, which led to dramatic changes that improved the quality of our lives through cleaner air and water. Shocked by the massive oil spill that fouled the beaches of Santa Barbara, California, in 1969, Wisconsin...

Keith Inman: We like being #1 in most ways — but not (as we are) for being first in nation for child abuse

Everyone likes to be ranked number one – especially here in Kentucky with our prized horses, bourbon, and basketball. But this? This is not a number one ranking Kentuckians should be proud of: Kentucky has the highest rate of child victims of abuse and is double the national rate. Since 1923, Kosair Charities has helped children reach their potential while overcoming their obstacles. Now in our...

Bill Straub: Since it’s baseball season, let’s bat some things around — oops, out of strikes already

It’s baseball season once again — thank the lord — so let’s toss it around-the-horn political style: First. Give Rep. Thomas Massie, R-SomewhereorotherLewisCounty, credit – he’s not afraid to make a fool out of himself. And this time Wonder Boy, as the old saying goes, did it in front of God and everybody. Massie serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee,...

Richard Nelson: Equality Act has a clever, noble name but carries troubling consequences

The Equality Act (HR 5) is moving in Congress but Congressman James Comer (R-Tompkinsville) is “deeply troubled” after looking into the details. “It’s a clever name with an allegedly noble purpose,” Comer said before the House Committee on Education and Labor, “but a vehicle for serious harmful consequences.” The act adds “gender identity” and “sexual...

Constance Alexander: Mark Twain might be pleased with this poetry celebration that’s ahead of its times

When Mark Twain declared, “When the end of the world comes, I want to be in Kentucky, because everything there happens 20 years after it happens anywhere else,” he had no way of knowing that one Kentucky community has taken the lead in observing April as National Poetry Month. For the second year in a row, the Calloway County Public Library is hosting a public reading of poems by Kentucky writers...

Mike Farrell: With so many things off track, including #MeToo, the question is — what’s our character?

The #Me Too train has run off the tracks. Please don’t misunderstand me. I have always believed in the equality of women. In my 50-year career, I have worked for two women, both of them skilled and intelligent leaders. I learned loads from them. I am revolted by the Harvey Weinsteins of the world who use their power and position to demand sex from young women seeking acting jobs. If he is as guilty...

Beshear: Attorney General’s office continues effort to ensure affordable health care for Kentuckians

We all pay too much for health care. Beshear Far too many do not go to the doctor or fill a prescription because it simply costs too much. I am fighting on many fronts to protect access to affordable health care because I don’t want to see medical bills continue to climb and millions of people to lose coverage. I don’t want folks with pre-existing medical conditions – like asthma and diabetes...

Al Cross: Slow pace so far for the primary and those seeking to be governor; we need to know more

In little more than five weeks, Kentuckians will go to the polls to begin the process of electing their next governor or giving the current one four more years. But the race has seemed to have a slow pace. That’s partly because there are fewer journalists to cover it, leaving the candidates’ media messages largely unfiltered and unquestioned. But if you look closely, their first television commercials...