A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Commentary: As pandemic continues, more emergency assistance needed for affordable homes

By Marilyn Harris, Tiffany Marthaler and Adrienne Bush Special to NKyTribune In times of natural disasters, providing housing for those in need is one of the first steps taken in rebuilding communities. We must ask our legislature, why in the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the subsequent economic disaster, are long term housing strategies not playing a larger role in stimulating our economy and...

Constance Alexander: Thanksgiving: Canned cranberry sauce with a side of family memories

When I was growing up, creamed onions and Scotch whiskey were essential to a proper Thanksgiving. The onions paid homage to Mother’s Irish heritage, and the whiskey a wink to Daddy’s ancestry. Besides the big bird, two kinds of potatoes — mashed white and sumptuous sweet – topped the list. Baskets of Parker House rolls added more temptation, with enough butter to clog even the spunkiest...

Richard Nelson: Beshear keeps casinos open while closing schools, restaurants, churches, and more

Gov. Andy Beshear issued more executive orders on Wednesday in response to a rise in COVID-19 cases throughout the Commonwealth. Beshear ordered K-12 schools, restaurants, event venues, and bars to close their doors beginning Friday. The order permits curbside pickup, delivery, and patio seating (which is rendered impractical by the winter weather). At the same time Beshear is allowing casino gambling...

Billy Reed: November 22, 1963, a day that changed world and a reminder not to give up on democracy

As I was driving my 1957 black Chevy convertible past Lexington’s Blue Grass Field, I was feeling good. Only 19, I already was covering high school sports for The Leader, the city’s afternoon newspaper, and I was on the way to Princeton, in deep western Kentucky, to cover a playoff game between Lafayette High, a team I had covered all season, and Caldwell County, led by Kerry Curling, a two-way...

Terry Brooks: Let’s flip destiny for Kentucky’s kids — KIDS COUNT data can inspire action

Jyoti Arora in You Came Like Hope asserts, “it takes only a moment for the destiny to flip over.” The message emanating from the 2020 Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book is that far too many boys and girls in the Commonwealth had their destiny flip the moment they were born. Because of the zip code in which they live, the color of their skin, or how much money their parent is making. Click image...

Brennan Center: Why the election lawsuits will fail; there’s no evidence of fraud, just accusations

By Myrna Perez Brennan Center for Justice Earlier, I wrote that the flurry of lawsuits filed by President Trump’s campaign were unlikely to have an impact on the election and laid out the reasons why. Since then, more lawsuits have been filed by the Trump campaign and other sympathizers, like the Republican National Committee and True the Vote. In total, 31 such suits have been filed since Election...

Bill Straub: Mitch is in for another term and setting a record, but ‘lovable’ as a warm puppy he really isn’t

As if running up the score on an overfunded and overrated Democratic opponent wasn’t sufficient, supporters of Senate Majority Leader Mitch “Root-‘n-Branch” McConnell now apparently want you to believe the lawmaker who revels in being called the Grim Reaper is really as lovable as a warm puppy. Scott Jennings, a top-notch GOP operator, recently penned an op-ed for The Courier Journal of...

Jeanne Gripshover: Nurse practitioner urges open access to non-opioid drug to address withdrawal

What good is health coverage if access to fundamental, lifesaving treatments is determined by nameless cost controllers and not the practitioners who evaluate patients? My Florence-based family practice sees numerous Northern and Central Kentucky patients each month, many of whom are suffering from both the physical pain, and the social stigma, of opioid dependency and addiction. COVID-19 has increased...

Maridith Yahl: I report about COVID, but having been exposed, quarantined and scared, please wear mask

The day had been an ordinary day, nothing outstanding or special. I was relaxing on the couch, snuggling with my dog when I got the text. A friend I had just seen was sick. At first, she was just not feeling. Nothing specific, just worn out and tired. The next night, she told me she was feeling achy and hurt all over. No fever though. Later, the fever came, then nausea and vomiting, and then the unmistakable...

Jan Hillard: COVID 19, the flu, smallpox, more and the curious case of anti-vaccination from beginning

Suspicion about vaccines is not new. Opposition to vaccinations dates back to the 1800s when some resisted taking the smallpox vaccine. People have refused to take vaccines, claiming ineffectiveness, violation of religious practice. Today some embrace conspiratorial claims such as the COVID vaccine is really secret DNA gathering to control the population (as in the “documentary” Plandemic). Fears...

Angela Yannelli: Assessing the positive as we find common ground to prevent domestic violence

I turned on the news recently like so many of us do to start our day. It wasn’t much different than other days — rising COVID-19 cases and deaths, the transition of power in our nation unsettled, confusion among our elected officials, and a divide in our country centered around the rights and humanity of the oppressed. So I turned off the television and began to take assessment of what we can...

Commentary: Citizen voices are key to COVID-19 response in education and beyond

By Natalie McCutchen, Annette Hines, and Spandana Pavuluri Prichard Committee volunteers Add to Kentucky’s groundswell of education influencers some innovative, if earnest, laypeople. We are part of a citizen research team of school stakeholders. We call ourselves the “Intergen 9”, and we comprise three parents, three teachers, and three students representing eight districts across the Commonwealth,...

Al Cross: Mitch McConnell has the switch to turn off The Trump Show, but will he use it?

As far as we know, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell hasn’t told President Trump to throw in the towel and start funding the transition to President Biden. That’s a message that would quickly emit from the leakiest White House in living memory. So why hasn’t he given Trump the word, for the good of the country? For one thing, the current episode of The Trump Show may be the climax of the...

Bill Straub: Listen closely to Beethoven’s Eroica, Mitch; recall he ripped away dedication to Napoleon

The world this year is justly celebrating the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth. One of the pieces one is likely to encounter during this festive occasion is one of the master’s greatest works, his groundbreaking Third Symphony, first performed in 1804. Beethoven, it is written, planned to dedicate his E flat major opus to Napoleon Bonaparte, recognizing that the French statesman had seemingly...

Jason Glass: November a time to bring attention to prevalence of homeless youth in Kentucky

November is National Homeless Youth Awareness Month, a time for us to bring attention to the prevalence of homeless youth within Kentucky and create an awareness of the challenges faced by students and families experiencing homelessness. Each year, more than 24,000 of students across our Commonwealth experience some form of homelessness or housing instability. These students can be living in motels,...