A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Bill Straub: What in tarnation is going on in NKY? Outlier is one thing, but total confrontational?

A friendly acquaintance, James Carville, who guided Wallace Wilkinson’s successful campaign for governor in 1987 before earning fame and fortune ramrodding Bill Clinton’s 1992 presidential effort, once remarked of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania that it was Pittsburgh on one end, Philadelphia on the other end and Alabama in the middle. There’s still a lot of truth in that. To take it a step...

Al Cross: As primary voters move GOP farther right, will others follow?

Tuesday’s primary elections in Kentucky reflected increasing polarization of the two political parties. The Republican Party kept moving right, with the victories of several candidates who campaigned primarily on cultural issues and against government overreach. The Democratic Party kept moving left, with the U.S. Senate primary victory of former state Rep. Charles Booker of Louisville, probably...

Michael Gieske: Seeking equity for lung cancer research funding; KY has high morbidity rate

Lung Cancer remains the deadliest of the major cancers, killing more Americans than breast, colon, and prostate cancer combined. Lung cancer kills 3 times as many women as breast cancer. Each year over 235,000 individuals are diagnosed with lung cancer; each day over 350 of our friends and family die from lung cancer. Lung cancer is so deadly because of its aggressive fast-moving nature, that historically...

Constance Alexander: Art, business forge connections through SBDC workshop

Ask any individual or group how creativity affects their business, or how their business incorporates creativity, and then be prepared to sit back and listen. You’ll get an earful. Such was the case last week, at a workshop entitled “Art Builds Business. Business Builds Art,” conducted at Murray’s Convention and Visitor Bureau. Co-facilitators were Aaron Harned, from Paducah’s Small Business...

Amye Bensenhaver: As AG, Cameron is danger to public’s right to know, would be worse as Governor

While there is no Kentucky Attorney General who is — or was — deserving of consistently high grades for dispassionately interpreting the Commonwealth’s open government laws, the current Attorney General, Daniel Cameron, has dishonored himself with consistently failing grades. The statutorily assigned duty to adjudicate open records and open meetings disputes is not one that any Attorney General...

Joe Heller: This week in the news from a cartoonist’s point of view, broad strokes, full color, few words

                Joe Heller was the editorial cartoonist for the Green Bay Press-Gazette in Green Bay, Wis., from 1985 until being laid off in July 2013. He still draws five cartoons a week and distributes them through his own syndicate. Through Heller Syndication, his cartoons regularly appear in more than 400 newspapers, making him the most successful...

Commentary: Taking action to ban menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars will save lives

By Janie Heath, Ellen Hahn, Audrey Darville and Lovoria Williams Special to NKyTribune The news of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s proposal to ban mentholated cigarettes and flavored cigars will save lives. Every two and a half minutes, someone in the U.S. is diagnosed with lung cancer. Every day in the U.S., 400 lives are lost to lung cancer. If the FDA’s proposal is approved, researchers...

Bill Straub: Poor grifter McConnell, what will he do when the heat gets hot on the filibuster? Your guess

It’s no secret that Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell would joyfully strike a Faustian bargain to regain his position as the upper chamber’s majority leader even if it means, perhaps, forfeiting the one item he cherishes most in this world – the filibuster. The Louisville lawmaker tut-tuts the possibility, insisting he will remain steadfast in his embrace of the odd Senate rule that requires...

Al Cross: Book shows Mitch McConnell in the Trump crucible

As Congress was concluding the business of certifying a new president, a task violently interrupted by a mob provoked by the outgoing president, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell “had had enough” of Donald Trump. “His majority was broken, the Capitol was desecrated and the country was humiliated in the eyes of the world.” So write Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns of The New York Times...

Joel Thornbury: Amid record-high inflation, PBMs continue to force higher health care costs on Kyians

Between record-high inflation and increased gas prices, American families are feeling the financial strain at every turn. And sadly, it’s happening at the pharmacy counter, too. While the price of prescription drugs has been straining our wallets for years, one of the leading reasons why might come as a surprise. It’s easy to point the finger at drug manufacturers, but they’re only part of the...

Constance Alexander: Workshop helps local artists find value of color in the study of still life painting

On a random Tuesday afternoon, stepping into Gallery 109 and Fairbanks Studio in Murray is a little like entering a place of worship. The mood is serene, quiet but welcoming. Six people are busy at work, each in various stages of silent concentration. In the background on this dreary spring day, Nat King Cole is singing “Autumn Leaves.” The only other sounds are gentle wisps of activity: Brushstrokes...

Keith Taylor: Name, image and likeness rules are changing game in college sports and not for better

Let the bidding begin. It appears some college players and their agents – yes, agents – are beginning to treat the transfer portal and the name, image, and likeness rules more like free agency than an opportunity to receive fair compensation for their talents while attending college to obtain a degree. Reportedly, South Dakota State standout Baylor Scheierman had a cover letter of NIL demands...

Joe Heller: Cartoonist’s view of the week in the news — full color, broad brush strokes, few words

                Joe Heller was the editorial cartoonist for the Green Bay Press-Gazette in Green Bay, Wis., from 1985 until being laid off in July 2013. He still draws five cartoons a week and distributes them through his own syndicate. Through Heller Syndication, his cartoons regularly appear in more than 400 newspapers, making him the most successful...

Sen. John Schickel: Senate Bill 1 is a win for Kentucky students and parents

After eight years of effort, with Senate Bill 1 becoming law, the voice in our schools’ operations has been given back to the parents and residents of communities who fund them. This year’s Senate Bill 1, which I was proud to sponsor, gives important school governance issues, such as decisions on curriculum and principal selection, back to Kentuckians. Sen. John Schickel Superintendents,...

Bill Straub: Dodging the crux — again — McConnell’s anger regarding leaked SCOTUS opinion misplaced

The United States Supreme Court, in its infinite wisdom, appears poised to move the nation backward by revoking a well-established constitutional right and Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is screeching mad about it – not over the loss of natural liberty, mind you, but regarding the way the public learned about it. You may have heard, unless you’ve been exploring Mammoth Cave for the past...