A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Lauren and Rob Hudson: Positive message for youth about exceptionalism through courage

Columns for families based on the book “It Can Be Done” @studentsleadusa Courage (or a lack thereof) is a big part of life. When some people think about courage, they think of war heroes on a battlefield, but it’s about far more than that. Courage means tackling challenges and difficulties without letting fear overcome us. Even if we don’t consider ourselves to be particularly courageous,...

Vanita Gupta: Facebook’s new policy gives politicians free rein to spread misinformation, inflame tensions

After Facebook was implicated in the 2016 election wreckage, the company made strides to shore up the platform against future harms to our democracy. But now, Facebook is sabotaging its own efforts through a new policy: the explicit exemption of politicians’ speech from its community standards. Since 2016, Facebook has maintained a “newsworthiness” exemption, meaning content that violates community...

Trudy Lieberman: Rising drug prices put pressure on Congress to act, but drugmakers are powerful lobby

Maybe – just maybe – Americans will get some relief from the relentlessly rising prices of pharmaceuticals. That, of course, depends on Congress pushing back against the drug companies’ formidable lobbying machine, their generous campaign contributions, and the industry’s historical coziness with members of Congress. But this year seems different. When you consider that the country’s spending...

Bill Straub: Where oh where have all the statesmen gone, and look what’s left? Then there’s Tom Loftus

Some years back, Kentucky had a gentleman serving in the Senate named John Sherman Cooper, from Pulaski County, who regularly voted against the positions endorsed by his own political party, worked diligently with members of the opposing party — befriending one who ultimately would become president — and pulled out all the stops to end the Vietnam War, much to the consternation of a president...

Constance Alexander: New York Times’ 1619 initiative takes in-depth look at beginning of slavey in America

Imagine. The middle of the ocean. No land in sight. An endless seascape. The sky a cloudless wash of gray. Strain to hear the plaintive cry of a seagull. Squint hard enough and maybe there’s a sign of land. Of home. One, two, three weeks pass. No more wishing for the lost family. You will never see them again. The sounds of their voices already faded. Hopeless. The feel of the bodies crammed in with...

Ed Massey: Career and Technical Education working group highlights progress, need for reform

As a former school board member and someone with a lifelong passion for education, I am honored to serve as a member of the Kentucky General Assembly’s Career and Technical Education Task Force. Our working group meets monthly to hear testimony from state officials and educators, as well as to study the best methods for improvement to our system of career and technical education. The need to prioritize...

Lauren and Rob Hudson: Positive message for youth about exceptionalism through competition

Columns for families based on the book “It Can Be Done” @studentsleadusa What can be wrong with having a competitive spirit? We should want to win and be the best, shouldn’t we? Some people think this way, but others don’t like competition, mainly because it can often feel more peaceful and comfortable not to compete. It’s easy to say we want everybody to be happy and win, but with competition,...

Commentary: One thing on which there is no rivalry; We are one when it comes to preventing child abuse

By Dr. Melissa Currie and Dr. Christina Howard It’s finally Fall in the Commonwealth, which means cooler temperatures, leaves changing, and college football season. As child abuse pediatricians at University of Kentucky and University of Louisville, we are well aware of the deep rivalry when it comes to our sports programs, and we both proudly support our team. As competitive as our respective universities...

Derek Winebrenner: The case for after-school programming and providing a safe place for students

As community learning center (CLC) coordinator, my role is to support the students of our school district during out-of-school time. CLC programs help bridge the gap between student needs and success outside of the classroom.  Because out-of-school programming occurs outside the first and last bell of the school day and throughout the summer, CLC coordinators have a unique perspective into the lives...

Constance Alexander: Those who choose not to read have no advantage over those who can’t 

In 1986, the Graves County school district banned the reading of William Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying” based on the charge that it was offensive, obscene, and took the Lord’s name in vain. The ban was later reversed after negative media attention and intervention by the American Civil Liberties Union, but the next year the Faulkner novel was again the target of a proposed ban in Somerset, Kentucky....

Al Cross: As political earthquake shakes Washington, how will it tilt Kentucky’s political landscape?

A political earthquake is shaking Washington. How will it tilt Kentucky’s political landscape? The quick and easy answer – and for now, probably the right one – is that the impending impeachment of President Trump will rally his Kentucky supporters and help re-elect unpopular Gov. Matt Bevin. As soon as the Democrat-controlled U.S. House announced its impeachment inquiry, the Kentucky Republican...

Prichard Committee: New five-star ratings and 2019 test data spotlight need for shared vision and action

The results released from the Kentucky Department of Education include a new rating system for Kentucky schools and evidence of student performance declining in most subject areas and for many student groups. The Prichard Committee urges all Kentuckians to study both the ratings of their schools and the underlying data on how well we are equipping the next generation to succeed. Three primary areas...

Melissa Martin: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in children is a mental health issue and it can be treated

Shawn’s mother brought him to therapy because she noticed he began to squeeze his head in the mornings before school. He was trying to “squeeze out the thoughts.” Shawn (a 5-year old) was experiencing ruminating thoughts that “would not go away.” He was having unwanted intrusive thoughts. Kate (a 9-year old) developed an irrational fear that certain foods would harm or poison her. She read...

Lauren and Rob Hudson: Positive messages for youth about exceptionalism through charity

Columns for families based on the book It Can Be Done @studentsleadusa If somebody describes America as a selfish or greedy country, we shouldn’t fall for it. Tens of millions of Americans have made charity a priority throughout their lives. Most assistance for people who needed it traditionally came from family, churches and charity. Partly because of neighbors pitching in to help neighbors, we...

Michael Dusing: Massive study sheds new light on prostate cancer treatment for African American men

Medical researchers led by University of Michigan doctors wanted to answer the question: Is black race associated with worse prostate cancer outcomes after controlling for variables such as access to care? The question is important because African American men in the United States are more than twice as likely to die from prostate cancer as Caucasian men. The reason for the disparity, in black and...