A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Jason Glass: Now is the time to work together to create a new future in education for Kentucky

It’s been a little over a year now since I joined the Kentucky Department of Education as its commissioner. During that time, my focus has been on listening to the people of my home state telling us what is working in education in the Commonwealth and where we need to improve. Through the Keep, Stop, Start survey that took place shortly after I arrived to the virtual listening tour that took place...

Bill Straub: Fair play isn’t James Comer’s idea of a good idea; shouldn’t we hold everyone accountable?

Congressional Republicans, disregarding the advice of the late Kenny Rogers, are counting their money at the table, smug and confident with the prospect of assuming control of the House next year, providing them with yet another opportunity to do what they do best – cause mischief while providing few results. It is, in fact, about the only thing the modern GOP appears capable of since it has abandoned...

Doug Flora: Pharmacy benefit managers’ influence in cancer care is harming the patient/doctor relationship

Quality, innovative, individualized care is key to beating a cancer diagnosis. As an oncologist for almost 20 years, my goal has always been just that — to walk beside my patients through their entire cancer journey while offering a personalized treatment plan to give them the best chance at survival. Over the past two decades I’ve seen oncology care change dramatically. Although we still can’t...

Marcus Jackson: It’s time for the Ky. Department of Corrections to meet the needs of those in their care

Kentucky is suffering a crisis of mass incarceration and family separation. We have the third-highest rate of children with an incarcerated parent, forcing many children to live with other caregivers. This is largely fueled by draconian sentencing from the failed war on drugs and the belief that incarceration, instead of treatment, is the solution to substance use disorder. The Kentucky Department...

Constance Alexander: Struggles of fictional KY family reflect the past and foretell the future

Names of U.S. military killed in Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941 (Photo by Razak Abu Bakar) On December 7, 1941, news of the attack on Pearl Harbor interrupted regular radio programming, disrupting religious services, movie screenings, and Sunday suppers. At first, some details of the devastation were withheld to avoid panic, but what was revealed exposed enough for the public to realize the losses were...

Cole Raines: High-speed internet is the key to unlocking Eastern Kentucky’s potential

When Daniel Boone and early pioneers blazed a trail into the Kentucky wilderness via the Cumberland Gap, they quickly realized both the immense challenges and opportunities that lay before them on the new frontier. Two and a half centuries later, the rugged terrain of the Appalachian Plateau remains simultaneously an alluring landscape of unmatched beauty and a stubborn obstacle to connectivity and...

Joe Heller: A cartoonist’s look at events of the week — shared in color with broad strokes and few words

            Joe Heller was the editorial cartoonist for the Green Bay Press-Gazette in Green Bay, Wis., from 1985 until being laid off in July 2013. He still draws five cartoons a week and distributes them through his own syndicate. Through Heller Syndication, his cartoons regularly appear in more than 400 newspapers, making him the most successful self-syndicated...

Becky Smith Jones: Kentuckians deserve to see new legislative maps and have time to evaluate them

Knowledge is Power. It’s a truth that philosophers, educators and politicians have acknowledged for hundreds of years, if not millennia, sometimes for the betterment of the few, sometimes to the detriment of the many. The League of Women Voters of Kentucky (LWVKY) has spent the better part of the past two years educating the public about the issues surrounding redistricting that accompany the decennial...

Bill Straub: Mitch McConnell only has eyes for inflation, because it’s just convenient for him

With unemployment nationally nearing all-time record lows – Nebraska, at 1.9 percent, is concerned there are too many jobs and not enough workers – and take-home pay on the upswing from sea to shining sea under a Democratic administration, it seems Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell and his GOP congressional colleagues only have eyes for inflation. McConnell, of Louisville, has been hammering...

Mitch McConnell: New Kentucky projects highlight the Commonwealth’s clout in Washington

Kentucky and Washington, D.C. may only be separated by a few hundred miles, but the two places sometimes feel wildly out-of-step. Democrats are fully committed to reckless proposals aimed solely at appeasing their far-left base, ignoring Kentuckians’ needs. Amid these partisan fights, though, I have never lost sight of my most important job: delivering wins for the Commonwealth and my constituents. During...

Ryan Quarles: With crisis looming, Kentucky is situated to be home to resolving supply chain issues

As Kentuckians gather around their tables for the Thanksgiving holiday, many will share thanks and gratitude for the ability to come together after a trying two years. But as they sit at the table, odds are high that family discussions will be dominated by talk of historic inflation and the supply chain crisis affecting our country. Nationally, workers seemed to have disappeared from the labor force....

Constance Alexander: Celebrating the holiday season with books by Kentucky writers

Swamped by yuletide frenzy, supply chain snags, and rising inflation? This could be the year to practice the Icelandic ritual of Jólabókaflóð, snuggling down on Christmas Eve to spend the rest of the night luxuriating in bed, reading. A well-chosen book can be a great holiday companion, and there are plenty by Kentucky writers — new and old – that would make great beginnings for a hectic...

Joe Heller: Broad brush strokes, full color, and few words — the news of the week in cartoons

                Joe Heller was the editorial cartoonist for the Green Bay Press-Gazette in Green Bay, Wis., from 1985 until being laid off in July 2013. He still draws five cartoons a week and distributes them through his own syndicate. Through Heller Syndication, his cartoons regularly appear in more than 400 newspapers, making him the most successful...

Al Cross: Is there any room remaining in politics for nice guys like Larry Hopkins?

The devolution of American politics, led by the Republican caucus in the U.S. House, can be told in the stories of two members of the caucus, 30 years apart: Larry Hopkins of Kentucky and Paul Gosar of Arizona. “Nice guy” was the most-often heard description of Hopkins, who died Monday, Nov. 15. Three days later, Gosar’s colleagues censured him for publishing a cartoon that showed him beheading...

Bill Straub: Play with fire, get burned; Trump is making that clear when it comes to Mitch McConnell

It would be inaccurate to maintain that former President Donald J. Trump has finally gone off the rails — the Orange Menace was already and has for a long time been a psychological train wreck. But his most recent fascination babbled ad infinitum over a series of emails dispensed to his followers, firmly establishes that the man 77 million people thought should be returned to the most powerful...