A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Lynn James: 21st decade of 21st Century is off to a blazing start, not wanting to be outdone by the last

Has anyone noticed when we started the new year, we started a new decade? Yes, a decade starts with the year ending in a “1” not a zero. And what a roaring start! This has indeed become “our winter of discontent” in more ways than one.   Between the pandemic of the virus, ignorance of our nation’s by-laws, and relentless snow in February, we certainly can’t compare the opening of this...

Alissa Briggs: How you can help prevent teen suicide as pandemic takes toll on Kentucky’s students

In a 2018 survey, about 16% of Kentucky students said they had considered ending their own life. During the pandemic, healthcare providers have seen an increase in psychiatric disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children as young as elementary school age. The increased feelings of isolation, loneliness, fear and uncertainty can have a detrimental effect on a child’s mental health. Other...

Stephanie Poynter: Prioritizing oral health sets kids up for a healthier, brighter future

It is no secret that Kentucky has historically had a poor reputation when it comes to our dental health. In a recent study ranking states with the best and worst dental health, the Commonwealth ranked 41st in the nation in indicators of dental wellness. We have among the lowest dentists per capita, highest sugar-sweetened beverages consumption, and highest percentage of adult smokers – all contributing...

Jim Waters: Protect journalists, activists from vindictive lawsuits; then there are also public records

It’s one thing for government agencies to deny open records requests from the press or public. It’s quite another for those entities to file lawsuits in retaliation against the requesters. Yet such legal retribution is happening nationwide with increasing frequency, including in Kentucky, where seriously misguided efforts by the City of Taylorsville to silence frequent local-government critic Lawrence...

Bill Straub: McConnell put his energies into court appointments (not much avail); Biden can do better

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, as benevolent as ever, has graciously decided to forgive U.S. Circuit Court Judge Merrick Garland for pursuing a Supreme Court appointment he intended to steal and will support Garland’s nomination to serve as attorney general. What a guy! Garland, you’ll recall, was nominated by then-President Barack Obama, a Democrat, in March 2016 to fill the high court...

Chris Harlow: Legislation needed to protect patient-pharmacist relationship

If you spend time with people who work in the health care field, you’ll quickly recognize a common denominator: all of us feel a tremendous responsibility to help others. That’s one of the things that motivated me to pursue a career as a pharmacist in the first place.   While delivering care certainly looks a bit different these days, my colleagues and I remain committed to helping the patients...

Jennifer Doering: With new legislation on tap, let’s craft a solution that benefits Ky’s entire beer industry

Kentucky’s craft beer industry has enjoyed tremendous success in recent years thanks to the hard work of brewers, distributors and retailers who have contributed to putting that perfectly poured frosty beverage in your glass. In a state better known for its bourbon, we’re glad to see homegrown innovations in tasty craft brews getting well-deserved attention and market share. The laws governing...

Constance Alexander: Rand Paul fights on, with boorish behavior as his sullen superpower

A Genius of calligraphic swordsmanship, swashbuckler Zorro proudly wears a mask as he traces a Z onto a villain. Armed with a mask and shield, Captain America fearlessly routs the Nazis in World War II. Astride a splendid white horse, a masked Lone Ranger rides with Tonto to right the wrongdoings of the world, declaring, “We ride for justice. Justice is what I seek.” All swagger in suit and tie,...

Billy Reed: When players and gamblers mixed and a reminder that basketball can never relax its vigilance

I know this comes under the heading of “ancient history,” but I remain fascinated by the 1951 point-shaving scandal that brought college basketball to its knees. I think it has become a cautionary tale about what might happen when players and gamblers mix, as they did back then in Madison Square Garden in New York city. My interest mainly had been due to the University of Kentucky’s involvement...

Commentary: The voices of those in recovery offer glimmer of hope driving Kentucky Comeback

In Kentucky, you don’t have to look far to find one of us… a loved one, a neighbor, or a colleague who has struggled with drugs and alcohol. Or maybe you are one of us, too. But even if you’re one of the few who hasn’t been personally impacted by the addiction crisis, you’ve surely seen headlines and news stories about people who have tragically lost their lives because of this awful disease. Amid...

Joseph Kurtz: HB 149 offers Kentuckians the right to choose the education their children deserve

Former State Representative Jim Wayne authored an opinion piece calling on Catholics to oppose House Bill 149, which would create an educational choice program for Kentucky families. Rep. Wayne and I share a concern for ensuring that public policy serves the common good, and I appreciate him offering his views. Nevertheless, his arguments against House Bill 149 suffer from several factual errors and...

Bill Straub: The Republican Party is trying to find itself — a ‘house divided against itself cannot stand’

It was Lincoln, the pre-eminent member of a political organization formerly known as the Republican Party, who cited the synoptic gospels in declaring in 1858 that, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” That proposition, Lincoln told a friend, is “indisputably true,” adding “I want to use some universally known figure, expressed in simple language as universally known, that...

Al Cross: McConnell stayed true to form; no guardian of the republic, but ready for the next battle

As the House impeachment managers concluded their case against Donald Trump Saturday, one seemed focused on a senator in the front row. Rep. Joe Neguse, Colorado Democrat, had Republican Leader Mitch McConnell in mind. He began by quoting Henry Clay, the Kentucky Whig whose desk McConnell treasures, and who first inspired McConnell’s ambition to be a senator. He dropped the name of John Sherman Cooper,...

Jim Wayne: Why Catholics should oppose tuition tax credits for private schools

St. Agnes Catholic School in Louisville holds the distinction of being a U.S. Department of Education Blue Ribbon School four times. No other school in our commonwealth has achieved this prestigious honor of education excellence. As members of St. Agnes Church, my wife and I know our financial support of this school is part of our mission to share our faith with the new generation. Along with a well-rounded,...

Commentary: Every Kyian needs access to high-speed internet for school, remote work and telehealth

By Brigitte Blom Ramsey and Colby Hall 2021 is off and to the races, and already one topic is still dominating debate across our communities, state, and nation: access to high-speed internet. Upload speeds, middle mile, fiber, last mile, low earth orbiting satellites … for the average person, it is easy to get lost in the weeds. Technical terminology and complicated diagrams aside, what it comes...