A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Bill Straub: Quite a pair. As Trump disintegrates, McConnell just keeps digging grave for democracy

America’s Il Duce, one Donald John Trump, aka President Extremely Stable Genius, aka President Great and Unmatched Wisdom, in MacArthur-returns-to-the-Philippines mode, stormed Lafayette Park like a ground sloth on Monday to stand in front of a church and display a book he has never read, The Bible, whose passages he couldn’t distinguish from a limerick that starts “There once was a man from...

Prichard Committee: We call for racial equity and justice — in education, income, health and safety

We can no longer wait for another generation to pass while the slow lever of policy change takes hold. We must insist on a new kind of change now, change that will remedy the injustices that have been waged on Black communities for generations and end deeply embedded and persistent racism. We stand with our communities of color to insist on justice. We have simply not done enough to ensure equitable...

Commentary: Kentucky’s civil legal aid programs brace for unprecedented need for legal help

As we begin the process of reopening the economy and emerging from the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, the economic, health, and social/emotional hardships facing our communities will become clearer. COVID-19 will leave countless Kentuckians with new and unanticipated challenges. Many of the challenges will involve civil legal issues: keeping one’s home, protection from abuse, securing benefits...

Letter to the Editor: Statement from Kentucky Association of Chiefs of Police on George Floyd

Statement from Kentucky Association of Chiefs of Police June 1 On a day in which our country is once again faced with an incident where the trust in law enforcement was shaken, and a precious human life was lost, the Kentucky Association of Chiefs of Police (KACP) reiterates one of the most basic and primary tenets of our profession: the preservation of life. This concept is weaved into the very fabric...

Rob and Lauren Hudson: Letter of Common Ground about government control and higher education

Letters for families based on the book “It Can Be Done” @studentsleadusa We write to comment on costs and calls for universal government funding and control of another segment of our economy, higher education. Unfortunately, college tuition costs seem to go higher and higher each year. The College Board reported in 2017 that public universities increased the cost of student tuition a whopping 213...

Jacqueline Coleman: Gov. Beshear and I committed as good teammates, to end divisive political rhetoric

As part of Team Kentucky, Andy Beshear and I made a commitment to be good teammates to our fellow Kentuckians, to end the divisive political rhetoric and verbal attacks by demonstrating the compassion, empathy and leadership we believe they deserve. I wanted to govern with Andy because I believed he would deliver on the promise of unity, people over politics and civil discourse during his time as governor. Six...

Catrena Bowman-Thomas: Despite plentiful goodwill, an undercurrent of injustice — #ismysonnext?

As I look at our nation I stand in awe and dismay at the same time. I’m in awe of how the community has come together to deal with the ravages of the coronavirus pandemic. So many businesses, community organizations, local governments and private citizens have banded together to help fight COVID-19. People have given of their own personal resources to help those impacted in the community, we’ve...

Dr. Rudolph G. Buchheit: In Kentucky, we are meeting the engineering talent demand — and much more

Earlier this month, the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education released results of a study assessing engineering workforce trends relative to the offerings and effectiveness of engineering programs of Kentucky schools, colleges and universities. The study found that Kentucky engineering jobs are growing slightly faster than engineering jobs across the U.S., and that earnings for engineers are...

Bill Straub: Be prepared, ‘fanning the flames and condemning the fire’ has just gotten started

There was some strange fruit hanging from a tree on the grounds of the state Capitol in the hours before Memorial Day, fruit that was nowhere near as savage and ghastly as the sort Billie Holiday sang about, but strange nonetheless. A proud product of the Kentucky educational system, attending a rally to promote guns that morphed into a protest over state-mandated coronavirus restrictions, drove his...

Ashli Watts: Are we ready to reopen? As businesses do, please support them as they have supported us

As many businesses are reopening here in the Commonwealth, the question has been asked: are we ready?   And this is a valid question. For almost two months, we have seen the majority of Kentucky businesses close their doors, school taught remotely, churches not holding worship services and almost 35 percent of our population is now unemployed. The pandemic is unlike anything we have ever seen, and...

Stuart Sanders: Post-World War II ‘Greatest Generation’ teaches resilience against pandemic

For some of us, our resolve is cracking. Weeks spent at home avoiding the coronavirus has been tiring. We’re depressed. Our resilience is fading. To bolster my patience, I remember the Americans who endured the Great Depression and the shortages and horrors of World War II. Specifically, I think about my wife’s paternal grandfather and how he spent the first twenty years of his life. D. C. Neighbors...

Gov. Andy Beshear: Kentuckians prove we are a great people — strong, resilient, kind, compassionate

It is hard to believe that Kentucky saw its first confirmed case of COVID-19 just over two and a half months ago. The virus began spreading quickly, escalating like past pandemics such as the Spanish flu. Areas like New York and Louisiana saw spikes that exceeded their health care capacity, and the losses mounted. Here in Kentucky, we took quick and decisive action, declaring a state of emergency...

Aaron Thompson: Amid the uncertainty, Class of 2020, you’ll be better off with a college degree

As the head of public higher education in Kentucky, I’m usually asked to deliver at least one commencement address each May. If I were giving one this year, I’d probably start by offering both my congratulations and condolences. I’m certain you never imagined your high school or college career would come to a close during a global pandemic. I’m sorry that your graduation ceremony had to be...

Al Cross: On Memorial Day, we will get to see a story that was almost never told

Fifty-one years ago last month, my Clinton County High School classmate Paul Conner and I got on a bus in Lexington for a 4-H trip to Washington, D.C., our first visit there. We rode up with his parents, Murl and Pauline Conner, whom I knew mainly as mainstays of the local Farm Bureau. I also knew Murl from my work at WANY in Albany, where we would often read a notice that he would be at the courthouse...