A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: World War I — a confusing array of ethnic tensions as citizens are harassed, terrorized

Part 9 of a continuing series on World War I By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune On May 20, 1918, Kelley-Koett Manufacturing Company of Covington sponsored a large advertisement in The Kentucky Post promoting the American Red Cross’s second national war fund drive. The campaign’s mission was to procure funds to feed the “starving women and children in the ruined districts of France and...

Our Rich History: Vic Canfield and others preserving Covington, helping the past come alive today

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune This is first in a series on the preservation and revitalization of Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. If you’re interested in having your restoration or building project included in this series, please contact the Our Rich History editor, Dr. Paul Tenkotte, at tenkottep@nku.edu Canfield If you’ve visited Covington, Kentucky recently, you probably noticed...

Our Rich History; John Filson; first Kentucky historian, forgotten Cincinnati founder

By Steve Preston Special to the NKyTribune In his book Daniel Boone, John Mack Faragher describes John Filson as the living embodiment of Ichabod Crane.  With the image of a skinny, clumsy, colonial nerd in your mind, it might be hard to believe the accomplishments achieved by him in the rugged and dangerous landscape of pre-statehood Kentucky and frontier Ohio. John Filson John Filson helped bring...

Our Rich History: Poverty, homelessness, a challenge throughout our region’s history that persists today

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune A portion of this column originally appeared in Our Rich History on December 21, 2015. It has been reprinted here to promote the Northern Kentucky Forum’s “Poverty in Our Region: What Does History Tell Us?” on Tuesday evening, June 12, 2018, at 7 pm at Lincoln-Grant Scholar House, 824 Greenup St. in Covington, Kentucky. The Kenton County Infirmary (Rosedale...

Our Rich History: Ohio Valley land in demand; four flags flew over Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky

By Steve Preston Special to the NKyTribune Did you know that Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky have been considered French, British, Québécois, and United States territory?  Throughout American history, the Ohio Valley was a much-desired area of land. René-Robert Cavalier, Sieur de La Salle (1643-1687). Source: Wikimedia Commons. If the Ohio Valley was the heart of the Midwest, then the river systems...

Our Rich History: The Cincinnati German origins of Memorial Day — here’s the connection

By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune While doing research for The Cincinnati Germans in the Civil War by Gustav Tafel, which I translated from German and edited for publication in 2011, I came across an interesting reference to Memorial Day. It indicates that its origins may go back to a suggestion made by a Cincinnati German veteran of the Union Army. Lt. Col. Robert B. Beath reported...

Our Rich History: How World War I affected our region in May 1918 — citizenship, service, grand jury

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune World War I was one of history’s most unfortunate and confusing conflicts. Europe’s major powers literally bungled into it. At first, the United States attempted to remain neutral. In fact, Wilson’s campaign slogan in the presidential election of 1916 was, “He Kept Us Out of War.” However, the Zimmermann Telegram and increasing hostilities against...

Our Rich History: Remember April 23, 1968, when a destructive tornado stuck Falmouth?

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to the NKyTribune I vividly remember Tuesday, April 23, 1968. It was nine days after Easter. The skies were ominously still. Then, the clouds rolled in, and the day turned stormy and foreboding. At 1:40 pm, a tornado slammed into the small town of Falmouth, in Northern Kentucky’s rural Pendleton County. We listened to news updates on the radio, as my mother led us in prayer...

Our Rich History: Third District School is now an office building, Fifth Street Center in Covington

By David E. Schroeder Special to NKyTribune Travelers taking the Fifth Street Interstate-75 exit into Covington see this building often, but many have no idea it was once a thriving school serving Covington’s Westside neighborhood. The building is now called the Fifth Street Center and is home to many businesses. The origins of Third District School can be found in the pre-Civil War era. On April...

Our Rich History: William Behringer’s 1904 visit to the St. Louis World’s Fair changed a young man’s life

by Jason French Special to NKyTribune Is there a time that you can point to in your life that, through some amazing experience, your life changed? One hundred years from now, could an historian look at your diary and determine that same conclusion? It seems to me that the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis was the point that changed everything for William Behringer (1884-1948). William Behringer as...

Our Rich History: ‘Appearance of a Town of Some Respectability’ — part two on 18th-Century Cincinnati

Part two of a series. By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune The relationship between civilians and the military in Cincinnati was so bad that in May 1793, when General Anthony Wayne arrived with 1,000 troops to fight the Indians, he refused to garrison the fort. Instead, he set up a military camp near the mouth of Mill Creek, about a mile south and west of the fort. He called it “Hobson’s Choice.”...

Our Rich History: 18th Century Cincinnati — ‘The Appearance of a Town of Some Respectability’

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Cincinnati in its early years was not the cultured “Queen City” we know today. It was the tip of the spear in regards to the settlement of Ohio and the Old Northwest. With the 1783 signing of the Treaty of Paris, America won her independence and doubled in size. John Cleves Symmes (Source: Charles Greve, Centennial History of Cincinnati (Chicago, IL: Biographical...

Our Rich History 1968: Riots erupt in Cincinnati following assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Part 2 of a continuing series on the 50th anniversary of one of America’s great watershed years, 1968.  By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to the NKyTribune In last week’s column, we reviewed the life and Cincinnati connections of one of our nation’s greatest Civil Rights leaders, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  He was a courageous man committed to nonviolence, a visionary who strove for peace among...

Our Rich History: 1968, a turning point in U.S. and Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky history

Part 1 of a continuing series on the 50th anniversary of one of America’s great watershed years, 1968. By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune In 1968, I was only eight years old. Yet my parents, my teachers, my uncle, and newspaper and television journalists made me acutely aware that I was living through one of the most momentous eras in US history. Four years before, when I was just a toddler,...

Our Rich History: Remembering one of NKy’s forgotten high schools – St. James, Ludlow

By David E. Schroeder Special to NKyTribune We often think of schools as having a permanence about them. Once they are established, they last for generations. This is always not the case; schools sometimes live a short life and cease to exist. One such institution was St. James High School in Ludlow. Following the First World War, Northern Kentucky experienced a dramatic increase in the establishment...