A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: Covington’s Isabella H. Shepard was an early supporter of women’s suffrage

By Gregory J. Middleton Special to NKyTribune The women’s suffrage movement required many supporters and a lot of effort to keep moving in the right direction. While some suffragettes, like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, were names that have found their place in history, many have faded into obscurity. Isabella H. Shepard was a suffragette forgotten by history. She was born in Kentucky...

Our Rich History: Several presidents have visited Kentucky, and a new book tells that story

By Wayne Onkst Special to NKyTribune When President Trump visited Kentucky this fall, he was adding to the long history of presidential visits to the Commonwealth. For 200 years, presidents have traveled to Kentucky for public business, using the state’s centrally located rivers, railroads and airports. Kentucky has also played an important role in national politics at various times during U.S....

Our Rich History: Early Cincinnati cuisine — cooking over a hearth, game, plentiful corn, healthy fruit

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune The harvest time for gardeners and farmers alike has passed, and we’ve enjoyed Thanksgiving feasts. What did the first settlers of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky typically eat? The harvest was a time of great importance and great celebration out here on the frontier. It could also be a time of great trepidation as there were dangers associated with ensuring...

Our Rich History: Duveneck legacy thrives in California; and it’s more than famous art works

By James Ott Special to NKyTribune A varied cache of art treasures adorned the Monterey home of the late Hope Duveneck Williams, the last living grandchild of renowned artists Frank and Elizabeth Boott Duveneck. Hope lived on a hilltop in view of California 1 and Monterey Bay, famous for its deep underwater canyon teeming with varied marine life. I visited her in June 2014, in her residence in the...

Our Rich History: ‘Lost Northern Kentucky,’ a new book by Robert Schrage and David Schroeder

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Have you ever found yourself lost? Lost has many different connotations, often very positive. For example, you can be lost in a good book. Or you can lose yourself in a pleasant memory. Being lost, in fact, can sometimes be quite rewarding. Some of your favorite vacations may have occurred when you “got off the beaten path,” and allowed yourself to get...

Our Rich History: Veterans Day and the American Legion; honoring men and women who served

By David E. Schroeder Special to NKyTribune At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the Allies and the Germans signed an armistice at Compiegne, France bringing about the cessation of hostilities of the First World War on the Western Front. Beginning in 1919, Armistice Day began being celebrated in the United States on this date. The day was set aside to memorialize the 116,708...

Our Rich History: Treaty of Fort Finney, Ohio, 1786; though Ohio Valley sees all-out war until 1794

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune In the spring of 1786, Major Benjamin Stites of Redstone, Old Fort, Pennsylvania was on a trading trip down the Ohio River with a flatboat full of flour, whiskey, and other popular goods for Limestone (Maysville), Kentucky. He found trading competitive in the river town, as many traders stopped there. He decided to go further inland to Washington, Kentucky....

Our Rich History: It’s Covington, 1895. William Goebel not guilty in ‘duel’ charge, becomes Governor

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune On April 11, 1895, two shots fired nearly simultaneously rang out in front of the Farmers and Traders National Bank on the northwest corner of Sixth Street and Madison Avenue in downtown Covington. Future Kentucky Governor, William Goebel escaped with just his clothes being grazed by a bullet. Prominent Covington banker and former Confederate Officer, John L....

Our Rich History: The Northern Extension Center was the start of something new and special

By Lois Hamill Special to NKyTribune The University of Kentucky, a public university, was founded in 1865 in Lexington, Kentucky. As early as 1946, it initiated some extension courses at the Trailways Bus Station in Covington. On July 1, 1948 the University of Kentucky (UK) officially established the Northern Extension Center to offer a limited two-year college program in Northern Kentucky. Administrative...

Our Rich History: Two early residents left educational legacy in Northern Kentucky and beyond

By David E. Schroeder Special to NKyTribune Education in Northern Kentucky has a long and interesting history. The earliest schools in the region were begun by parents who were looking for an education for their children. These early schools charged a fee or tuition to pay a teacher to conduct classes. Beginning in the 1830s, both the public and parochial schools in Northern Kentucky began to take...

Our Rich History: The first Anglo burial in Cincinnati? Unknown soldier was part of ‘Bouquet’s Expedition’

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Although the area of Southwest Ohio we now call Cincinnati wasn’t settled until late in the year of 1788, it certainly didn’t mean Europeans hadn’t viewed the grounds here. Robert de La Salle, the intrepid French explorer, viewed the three terraces of Cincinnati. He was presumed to be the first European to float down the Ohio River, in 1669. Later, French...

Our Rich History: Frank Duveneck and his wife, Elizabeth — the story of art’s triumph over fate

By James Ott Special to NKyTribune Growing up in the 1850s in the Ohio River Valley, a mere decade or two from the raw frontier, artist Frank Duveneck (1848-1919) displayed a talent for creativity that served him well in good times and in bad. His natural talent surfaced in childhood. He molded toys from Licking River mud for his friends and painted signs, including one for his father’s beer garden...

Our Rich History: Cincinnati and the Fourth Estate — getting the news on the frontier through today

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Getting the news on the frontier in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky was a challenge. As settlers returned from visits back East or from the South, the latest information they relayed could be days or even weeks old. Believe it or not, that was relatively fast when compared to news from overseas. Foreign news could take upwards of four and a half months to reach...

Our Rich History: Kentucky and the first buildings in Cincinnati; 26 intrepid immigrants build first cabin

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune When the intrepid group of 26 brave immigrants arrived at what is now remembered as Yeatman’s Cove on December 28, 1788, they spent their first night ashore in what would become Cincinnati under the stars — without shelter. Getting out of the winter weather quickly was a priority for them. Using the only available source for lumber they had, their flatboats,...

Our Rich History: A 14,000 mile per hour shaking, Cincinnati and the New Madrid earthquakes

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune On December 16, 1811, Cincinnati was shaking loose its “frontier town” reputation — literally. The city had grown to over 2,000 residents and had about 360 buildings. Mostly gone were the log cabins, replaced with brick, wood frame, and even stone structures. The burgeoning city now stretched to a northern boundary of Seventh Street. The only American...