A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: Mansion Hill — from genteel subdivision to multiple-units to historic district

By Margo Warminski Special to NKyTribune Part 38 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Newport, Kentucky’s Mansion Hill is one of America’s great historic preservation success stories. And like many historic districts nationwide, its plot is familiar. From starting as a genteel subdivision to houses that have been subdivided into multiple units, and finally,...

Our Rich History: The Newport public school system reflects the evolution of American education

By Roger VonStrohe Special to NKyTribune Part 37 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” The evolution of public schools in the United States is positively reflected in the history of public education in Newport. Indeed, for a relatively small city in a traditionally southern state formed out of Virginia, Newport proved pioneering. In fact, the “Newport Academy...

Our Rich History: The environmental history of Newport, a former woodland with rich forest heritage

By Stanley Hedeen Special to NKyTribune Part 36 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” When Newport was incorporated in 1795, its landscape was much different than the present grid of buildings and streets. A forest canopy covered the land, with the exception of a few logged patches where pioneers made clearings for cabins and gardens. A squirrel could travel...

Our Rich History: Ice Age glaciers shaped the site of Newport; climate change will always have impact

Part 35 of our series, Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020. By Stanley Hedeen Special to NKyTribune Newport is bounded on the west by the Licking River and on the north by the Ohio River. Both streams often flood, but a gravel and sand terrace holds Downtown Newport above all but the highest inundations. These geographic features are the result of Ice Age visits by the Pre-Illinoian,...

Our Rich History: Newport High School, the oldest operating high school in Kentucky

By Roger VonStrohe Special to NKyTribune Part 34 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” In 1795, Newport was incorporated as a town on the south shore of the Ohio River, only three years after the new state of Kentucky was admitted to the union. Evident at that time was the need for an educational institution to serve the advancement of civilization in a new...

Our Rich History: Edward Ziegler remembers his Uncle Vincent, a soldier and family almost forgotten

Part 33 in the series, ‘Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020’ By Edward Ziegler Special to NKyTribune Whether it’s Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day, or even the Fourth of July, whatever else I’m doing I end up thinking about my uncle Vincent Steil, a young soldier killed during World War II. During this 75 anniversary year of the end of World War II, I also find...

Our Rich History: Hillside suburb of Newport, Clifton, agreed to be annexed in 1935, in Great Depression

By Margo Warminski Special to NKyTribune Part 32 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “In the late 19th Century, improvements in transportation made it more practical to develop the hillsides. It was at this time that the city of Clifton, a hillside suburb of Newport, was developed. Clifton was incorporated in 1888 by developers who chose the site due to...

Our Rich History: Organizing for Action: Women’s suffrage in Northern Kentucky, Part 2

By Paul Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 31 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020,” and Part 2 of our series: “Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky.” See Part 1 of our women’s rights series: “Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky” In 1888, the newly-founded Kentucky Equal Rights Association (KERA)...

Our Rich History: Organizing for action — women’s suffrage in Northern Kentucky

Part 30 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport Kentucky, 1795-2020″ and Part 1 of our series: Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky” By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKy Tribune Have you ever personally felt “boxed in”? That you had the intelligence, talents, skills, and ideas to contribute to society but were ignored? That you weren’t...

Our Rich History: Newport inventors include Granville Woods and first woman patentee in KY

By John Schlipp Special to NKyTribune Part 29 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” Historic US patents help to document early commercial developments in our region. The Northern Kentucky area, including Newport and Covington, spawned many industries in the nineteenth century, from clothing factories to rolling mills to furniture manufacturers. Allen’s Iron...

Our Rich History: The Flood of 1937 and flood control in Newport; a controversy over 79.99 ft. measurement

By Deborah Pitel Special to NKyTribune Part 28 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” In 1937, the population of the United States had reached 129 million, and the nation was deep in the throes of the Great Depression. In the early 20th century, continued immigration from Europe was accompanied by new migrants from Appalachia. They settled in cities like Newport,...

Our Rich History: The spirit of our German Heritage lives on through Newport’s Turnverein, closed in 1936

By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune Part 27 of our series: Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky Today the building at 22 E. 6th St. in Newport is the home of the James Wallace Costigan Post No. 11 of the American Legion. Few probably know that it once belonged to the Newport Turnverein, which was founded in 1852. Turner in German means “gymnast,” so the Turners had large halls...

Our Rich History: VE-Day, May 8, 1945, was official end of WW II European theater; victory was in reach

Part 6 of our continuing series on the 75th anniversary of the closing stages of World War II and Part 26 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Seventy-five years ago, on May 8, 1945 (called VE-Day, for “Victory in Europe”), World War II came to an official end in the European theater. The Nazis were defeated. Businesses...

Our Rich History: The Floods of 1913 in Newport caused terrific suffering and economic hardship

By Deborah Pitel Special to NKyTribune Part 25 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” By 1913, the United States saw a huge influx of immigrants, as the nation’s population reached 90 million people. The descendants of the original German, English, and Irish settlers in the Cincinnati area witnessed the arrival of new immigrants competing for jobs and housing....

Our Rich History: The floods of 1883 and 1884 in Newport — the ‘beautiful water’ escapes its banks

By Deborah Pitel Special to NKyTribune Part 24 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” The Ohio River was named by the Seneca from their word oheeyo, meaning “beautiful water.” Early pioneers were awed by the presence of the river, and President Thomas Jefferson called it “the most beautiful river on earth” (David Welky, The Thousand-Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi...