A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: Judge Nippert’s talk with Kaiser Wilhelm II; Wiedemann of Newport supported relief

By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune Part 71 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” On 23 July 1916, the New York Times carried a lengthy article: “A Two-Hour Talk with the Kaiser: Judge A.K. Nippert Brings Message to President Wilson and the American People from Wilhelm II.” Nippert (1872-1956), Judge of the Common Pleas Court of Cincinnati, had...

Our Rich History: Julia F. Gould of Newport, a well-known prima donna, is now largely forgotten

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 70 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Possessing a beautiful mezzo soprano voice, classically trained Julia F. Gould of Newport, Kentucky, was a consummate musician. She could play the piano, sing, and act. Hers was a promising career, featuring musical studies in Europe, and national tours with two important...

Our Rich History: The greatest watch works in the world: Newport’s lost industrial opportunity

By Alan F. Garratt Special to NKyTribune Part 69 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” In the 1880s, Newport, Kentucky was on the cusp of being the watchmaking capital of the world. It already boasted the “Largest Watch Case Factories on the Globe,” according to its founder John C. Dueber. The story of what caused him to move away from Newport and build...

Our Rich History: 1915 storm – with winds, rains – wrecked buildings, but not spirit of Newporters

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 68 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Wednesday, July 7, 1915, was a rather typical summer day in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The Cincinnati Post weather forecast predicted “showers and thunderstorms in this vicinity tonight and Thursday without much change in temperature.” With temperatures expected...

Our Rich History: Newport once had the region’s healthiest water supply — and led to its growth

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 67 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink!” This old saying would have aptly described the water supply of Cincinnati and Covington for most of the 1800s, at least in terms of modern health standards. Slaughterhouses and factories in the area dumped their waste...

Our Rich History: Cathedral Basilica window commemorates Pius IX and Ineffabilis Deux

By Stephen Enzweiler Special to the NKyTribune
 For decades, visitors and faithful alike have filed through the north doors of the Cathedral Basilica on their way to mass, confession, to pray at adoration, or perhaps celebrate a wedding. But high above them, patiently silent and framed in mortar and stone tracery, is a stained-glass window unlike any other in the Cathedral Basilica. It tells the...

Our Rich History: Batty about Cincinnati: Reds’ fans and their hometown team — what a team!

By John Schlipp Special to NKyTribune “The whole town’s batty, about Cincinnati,
 What a team, what a team, what a team, Each man and lady—from one to eighty, How they scream, how they scream, how they scream.” “The Whole Town’s Batty About Cincinnati” – Larry Vincent, 1961 These humorous lyrics are part of a Reds’ home team anthem composed by Larry...

Our Rich History: Building bridges, ending monopolies — Newport commuters

by Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 66 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” The opening of the Covington and Cincinnati suspension bridge in January 1867 marked the beginning of an era that witnessed a new metropolitan identity for Cincinnati, Covington and Newport. In addition, the construction of streetcar lines, tying the three cities together,...

Our Rich History: ‘Connecting the dots’ between Cincinnati, Covington and Newport

By Paul Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 65 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “Connecting the dots” is probably something all of us are familiar with. Children’s magazines, restaurant placemats, puzzles, and even school assignments often utilize “connect the dots” exercises to both entertain and teach children. However, “connecting the dots”...

Our Rich History: ‘Endless and bottomless sand’ nearly doomed Cathedral construction

By Stephen Enzweiler Special to the NKyTribune When the bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Covington, Camillus Paul Maes, sank the blade of his shovel into the earth in April 1894 to break ground for Covington’s new St. Mary’s Cathedral, he had high hopes that construction would commence quickly and proceed without incident. He and architect Leon Coquard had spent the previous two years meticulously...

Our Rich History: The Earth’s not flat, it’s . . . hollow? The other John Cleves Symmes

by Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Part 64 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “I declare the earth is hollow, habitable within and constituted of a number of concentric spheres.” Those were the words of John Cleves Symmes, Jr. — not the founder of the Miami Purchase and original owner of the land on which Cincinnati was founded — but his namesake...

Our Rich History: Dave Cowens and his life in Newport before the Hall of Fame

Part 63 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.”By Steve Preston Special to the NKyTribune “Our Rich History” editor’s note: This column is the 300th article in the “Our Rich History” weekly series for the NKyTribune. Many thanks to our publisher, our readers, all of our authors, and especially to Judy Clabes! Together, we look forward to continuing to...

Our Rich History: The music of Sin City — Newport’s cultural legacy of wild days past

By Chad Huggins Dunbar Special to NKyTribune Part 62 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” The era of Prohibition had lasting effects on societal norms regarding America’s bar culture. In the age of speakeasies (hidden, illegal nightclubs that served alcohol and entertainment), women were more welcome in bars than they were during previous times. At the same...

Our Rich History: Brighton Center, a shining ‘diamond’ in Newport, offers wide range of services

Part 60 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” By Samantha Hamilton Special to NKyTribune During a period of rapid urbanization and demographic change in Northern Kentucky, a diamond in the rough emerged in Newport’s West End. Illegal activities, including gambling and prostitution, ran rampant in the first half of the twentieth center in the city, when organized...

Our Rich History: Segregation and how it affected Newport’s underworld

By Chad Huggins Dunbar Special to the NKyTribune Part 59 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” A note from “Our Rich History” editor, Paul A. Tenkotte: Segregation in the United States was, from its start centuries ago, another ugly component of racism and of slavery, the “peculiar institution.” While the story of segregation in housing, employment,...