A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: The Humanities Enrichment Program and workshop series in the 1970s

By Tom Ward Special to NKyTribune Part 7 of our series: “Retrospect and Vista II: Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021” In the 1970s, colleges and universities throughout the United States benefitted from federal grants for programming, from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). One of the primary achievements of the Integrative Humanities...

Our Rich History: Pres. Richard A. DeGraff and the early 1970s at Thomas More College; ups and downs

By Ray Hebert Special to NKyTribune Part 5 of our series, “Retrospect and Vista II”: Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021 When Dr. Richard DeGraff began his term as the first lay president at Thomas More College, on July 1, 1971, the college was financially troubled. Most of DeGraff’s twenty years in higher education were spent in university development and fundraising, so he seemed to be...

Our Rich History: Renaissance ’71 — Celebrating 50 years of VMC/TMC; a Golden Jubilee was in order

By Dr. Raymond Hebert Special to the NKyTribune Part 4 of our series, “Retrospect and Vista II”: Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021 Msgr. John Murphy, president of Thomas More College, decided that the first fifty years of Villa Madonna College (VMC)/Thomas More College (TMC) should be celebrated in style. In the summer of 1970, he appointed a Golden Jubilee Committee, with representatives...

Our Rich History: Thomas More in early 1970’s, from Msgr. John Murphy to Dr. Richard DeGraff

By Dr. Raymond Hebert Special to NKyTribune Part 3 of our series, “Retrospect and Vista II”: Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021 Msgr. John Murphy was the dean/president of Villa Madonna/Thomas More College from 1951 to 1971. His title went from being “dean” to being “president,” at the same time as the bishop of the Diocese of Covington went from being “president” to “chancellor”...

Our Rich History: Thomas More — a college is born; driven by need for teachers with advanced degrees

By David E. Schroeder Special to NKyTribune Part 2 of our series, “Retrospect and Vista II”: Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021. Prior to the First World War, most women religious in the United States, including Northern Kentucky, received their teacher training through an apprentice system. Experienced teaching sisters taught classes to the postulants and younger sisters on how to teach....

Our Rich History: Retrospect and Vista II – Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021

By Raymond G. Hebert Special to NKyTribune Part 1 of our series, “Retrospect and Vista II”: Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021. Thomas More University, which previously was called Villa Madonna College (1921-1968) and Thomas More College (1968-2018), will be celebrating its Centennial during the 2021-2022 academic year. The Centennial’s celebration events will begin in Fall 2021 during...

Our Rich History: Dueling with Demons — Depression, debt, and deluge in Newport, 1873-1896

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 74 of the series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” The national economic depression that began in 1873 had far-reaching effects on American cities. In Newport, Kentucky’s case, however, the timing of the depression was worse than for many other municipalities. In 1873, the city had completed its new water works, at a vast...

Our Rich History: Misplaced priorities and missed opportunities, Newport’s Long Depression, 1873-1896

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to KyForward Part 73 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Have you ever found yourself feeling powerless? Surrounded by technology that seems to be pushing you aside? Led by unethical people with no backbone? Smack in the middle of a situation where all the least sustainable solutions to problems suffocated all of the really good...

Our Rich History: West Newport is thriving; surge of longtime, newer residents unite with shared vision

By Josh Tunning Special to NKyTribune Part 72 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Newport, Kentucky has a colorful and exciting past. From its first settlement by James Taylor, to its industrialization in the 1800s, to its Sin City days, and, finally, to what it is today, Newport is a vibrant and growing urban community. More recently, there is one neighborhood...

Our Rich History: Kentucky inventors, entrepreneurs, innovations; free workshop at NKU’s Grant Center

By John Schlipp Special to NKyTribune Kentucky is famous for its Bourbon, the Kentucky Derby, horse breeding, and historic tourist sites such as Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill. Yet the Bluegrass state also contributes its fair share of entrepreneurial and inventive commercial activity. This was affirmed recently by Site Selection magazine (Volume 66, Issue 2, March 2021, pages 67, 86), an industry...

Our Rich History: Judge Nippert’s talk with Kaiser Wilhelm II; Wiedemann of Newport supported relief

By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune Part 71 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” On 23 July 1916, the New York Times carried a lengthy article: “A Two-Hour Talk with the Kaiser: Judge A.K. Nippert Brings Message to President Wilson and the American People from Wilhelm II.” Nippert (1872-1956), Judge of the Common Pleas Court of Cincinnati, had...

Our Rich History: Julia F. Gould of Newport, a well-known prima donna, is now largely forgotten

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 70 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Possessing a beautiful mezzo soprano voice, classically trained Julia F. Gould of Newport, Kentucky, was a consummate musician. She could play the piano, sing, and act. Hers was a promising career, featuring musical studies in Europe, and national tours with two important...

Our Rich History: The greatest watch works in the world: Newport’s lost industrial opportunity

By Alan F. Garratt Special to NKyTribune Part 69 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” In the 1880s, Newport, Kentucky was on the cusp of being the watchmaking capital of the world. It already boasted the “Largest Watch Case Factories on the Globe,” according to its founder John C. Dueber. The story of what caused him to move away from Newport and build...

Our Rich History: 1915 storm – with winds, rains – wrecked buildings, but not spirit of Newporters

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 68 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Wednesday, July 7, 1915, was a rather typical summer day in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The Cincinnati Post weather forecast predicted “showers and thunderstorms in this vicinity tonight and Thursday without much change in temperature.” With temperatures expected...

Our Rich History: Newport once had the region’s healthiest water supply — and led to its growth

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 67 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink!” This old saying would have aptly described the water supply of Cincinnati and Covington for most of the 1800s, at least in terms of modern health standards. Slaughterhouses and factories in the area dumped their waste...