A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: Edward Ziegler remembers his Uncle Vincent, a soldier and family almost forgotten

Part 33 in the series, ‘Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020’ By Edward Ziegler Special to NKyTribune Whether it’s Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day, or even the Fourth of July, whatever else I’m doing I end up thinking about my uncle Vincent Steil, a young soldier killed during World War II. During this 75 anniversary year of the end of World War II, I also find...

Our Rich History: Hillside suburb of Newport, Clifton, agreed to be annexed in 1935, in Great Depression

By Margo Warminski Special to NKyTribune Part 32 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “In the late 19th Century, improvements in transportation made it more practical to develop the hillsides. It was at this time that the city of Clifton, a hillside suburb of Newport, was developed. Clifton was incorporated in 1888 by developers who chose the site due to...

Our Rich History: Organizing for Action: Women’s suffrage in Northern Kentucky, Part 2

By Paul Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 31 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020,” and Part 2 of our series: “Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky.” See Part 1 of our women’s rights series: “Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky” In 1888, the newly-founded Kentucky Equal Rights Association (KERA)...

Our Rich History: Organizing for action — women’s suffrage in Northern Kentucky

Part 30 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport Kentucky, 1795-2020″ and Part 1 of our series: Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky” By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKy Tribune Have you ever personally felt “boxed in”? That you had the intelligence, talents, skills, and ideas to contribute to society but were ignored? That you weren’t...

Our Rich History: Newport inventors include Granville Woods and first woman patentee in KY

By John Schlipp Special to NKyTribune Part 29 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” Historic US patents help to document early commercial developments in our region. The Northern Kentucky area, including Newport and Covington, spawned many industries in the nineteenth century, from clothing factories to rolling mills to furniture manufacturers. Allen’s Iron...

Our Rich History: The Flood of 1937 and flood control in Newport; a controversy over 79.99 ft. measurement

By Deborah Pitel Special to NKyTribune Part 28 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” In 1937, the population of the United States had reached 129 million, and the nation was deep in the throes of the Great Depression. In the early 20th century, continued immigration from Europe was accompanied by new migrants from Appalachia. They settled in cities like Newport,...

Our Rich History: The spirit of our German Heritage lives on through Newport’s Turnverein, closed in 1936

By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune Part 27 of our series: Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky Today the building at 22 E. 6th St. in Newport is the home of the James Wallace Costigan Post No. 11 of the American Legion. Few probably know that it once belonged to the Newport Turnverein, which was founded in 1852. Turner in German means “gymnast,” so the Turners had large halls...

Our Rich History: VE-Day, May 8, 1945, was official end of WW II European theater; victory was in reach

Part 6 of our continuing series on the 75th anniversary of the closing stages of World War II and Part 26 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Seventy-five years ago, on May 8, 1945 (called VE-Day, for “Victory in Europe”), World War II came to an official end in the European theater. The Nazis were defeated. Businesses...

Our Rich History: The Floods of 1913 in Newport caused terrific suffering and economic hardship

By Deborah Pitel Special to NKyTribune Part 25 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” By 1913, the United States saw a huge influx of immigrants, as the nation’s population reached 90 million people. The descendants of the original German, English, and Irish settlers in the Cincinnati area witnessed the arrival of new immigrants competing for jobs and housing....

Our Rich History: The floods of 1883 and 1884 in Newport — the ‘beautiful water’ escapes its banks

By Deborah Pitel Special to NKyTribune Part 24 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” The Ohio River was named by the Seneca from their word oheeyo, meaning “beautiful water.” Early pioneers were awed by the presence of the river, and President Thomas Jefferson called it “the most beautiful river on earth” (David Welky, The Thousand-Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi...

Our Rich History: Southgate Street School educated generations of African-Americans in Newport

By Shirlene Jensen Special to NKyTribune Part 23 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” Historically, African Americans of Campbell County aspired to attain an education commensurate to their basic rights of freedom. After the Civil War, the Freedman’s Bureau mandated that states provide for educating blacks. On August 1, 1866, the African-American citizens...

Our Rich History: The Buena Vista Historic District of Newport, itself the oldest of NKY’s river towns

By Margo Warminski Special to NKyTribune Part 22 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” “Newport’s social structure would also change fundamentally. A prosperous, old-stock, Protestant, river town would evolve into an immigrant, heavily Catholic, working-class city” (Thomas L. Purvis, et al., eds., Newport, Kentucky: A Bicentennial History. Newport, KY:...

Our Rich History: Newport’s Cote Brilliante (shining hill) Historic District thrives with new generation

By Margo Warminski Special to NKyTribune Part 21 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” The Cote Brilliante Historic District in Newport, whose name means “shining hill” in French, honors a physically cohesive, largely middle-class residential community with a strong sense of place. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2005, it was the fifth...

Our Rich History: Epidemics in 19th Century Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky; we have persevered

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Part 20 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” As we “hunker down” and practice self-distancing, it’s worth noting that we residents of the Tristate are much more resilient than we think. Since settlement began in the late 1700s, this area has faced epidemics on par with what we are currently experiencing, and without...

Our Rich History: George Wiedemann, Northern Kentucky’s Beer Baron and his brewery

Part 19 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020” By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune George Wiedemann (1833-1890) came to America from Germany in 1854, and after several years in the New World founded a brewery in Newport, Kentucky that became the largest south of the Ohio River and east of the Mississippi River, as well as a brewing family dynasty that...