A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: A tribute to Notre Dame in Paris — Our Cathedral’s Gargoyles, Chimera a shared history

Editor’s Note: We express our deep sorrow to the people of France and to the congregation of one of the world’s great religious edifices, Notre-Dame de Paris, following the tragic fire that struck it on Monday, April 15, 2019. Over $1 billion in pledges has been promised to date to pay for the restoration of this architectural masterpiece. In tribute to the spirit of the French people,...

Our Rich History: Cincinnati in 1894 — Fry’s Army (passes through) and a major economic depression

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune The sounds and smells of manufacturing still enveloped the city of Cincinnati and its Northern Kentucky suburbs in 1894. Some 100,000 people worked in the city’s industries, producing over $220,000,000 in products each year (“Queen, Indeed! Is Cincinnati among the Fair Cities of the Great Southwest,” Cincinnati Post, 5 January 1894. p. 1). Fry’s Army...

Our Rich History: You’ve heard of Salem Witch Trials but what about Clermont County Witch Trial

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Everyone’s heard of the Salem Witch trials of the late 1600s. During the hysteria that gripped the colony of Massachusetts, over 200 people were accused of practicing witchcraft, and over 20 died as a result of punishment or related injuries. It seemed no one was safe from accusations. Women and men, old and young alike were accused of witchcraft and casting...

Our Rich History: A new book, ‘Lost Amusement Parks of Kentuckiana’ by Carrie Cook Ketterman

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Eating packed picnic lunches underneath shady trees; enjoying trips along the Ohio River; watching people go by; savoring ice cream on a sweltering day, feeling the breeze as amusement rides whirled, sped, and tossed us around. It was a gentler and slower time during summers, when families and friends took streetcars and steamboats to their favorite amusement...

Our Rich History: The Big Red Machine and Cincinnati’s winning decade; remember ‘Great Eight’

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune When Bob Hertzel of the Cincinnati Enquirer coined the phrase; “The Big Red Machine” in his July 4, 1969 article, he would define a decade of Cincinnati baseball that is the stuff of legends. Baseball in Cincinnati during the seventies was a time of unbridled success and joy. The Reds played in four World Series, winning two. They also won six National League...

Our Rich History: 150th anniversary — Roots of Cincinnati Reds’ radio at Crosley Field

By John Schlipp Special to NKyTribune   (Part 2 of a three-part series celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Cincinnati Reds) Take me out to the ballgame,
Take me out to the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack
s don’t care if I never get back, Let me root, root, root, for the home team,
If they don’t win, it’s a shame. 
For it’s one, two, three strikes you’re...

Our Rich History: 150th Anniversary of the Reds, remembering defeat of Newport Wiedemann Brewers

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Part 1 of a three-part series celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Cincinnati Reds As all our region’s baseball fans look to opening day and wonder where and how much players like Bryce Harper and Manny Machado will sign for, there was a time even the best players had to scrape by to make a living. Many attribute the poor pay and treatment of early baseball...

Our Rich History 150 years ago, politics and racism polarized Americans; the role of Sen. John Sherman

Second of two parts By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune In last week’s column, we learned how racism in Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio made the passage of the 15th Amendment—granting the right to vote to all males regardless of “race, color, or previous condition of servitude”—an uphill battle. Although the legislatures of these three states eventually approved the amendment, lively debate...

Our Rich History: 150 years ago, politics and racism polarized Americans; the role of Sen. John Sherman

First of two parts By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Today, as we look back upon the Civil War and the period of Reconstruction following it, it may be difficult for us to contemplate an era when polarization was deeper and more prevalent than currently. But it was. We’ll never really know the extent of the carnage, but estimates of Civil War dead range from 630,000 to 700,000, including...

Our Rich History: The Black Brigade, mistreated heroes of the Siege of Cincinnati

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune As the City of Cincinnati mobilized to meet the forthcoming threat of Confederate invasion in late summer 1862, all able-bodied men were expected to help defend the city. African-American men were no exception. They organized themselves into a unit to take up arms against the Confederates. Fearing armed African Americans, however, city officials rejected their...

Our Rich History: Henry Boyd, once a slave, became a prominent African-American furniture maker

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Henry Boyd was born on a Kentucky plantation as a slave in 1802. For the first 18 years of his life, he would remain a slave. Boyd was apprenticed out to a cabinet maker. He had a tremendous talent for carpentry. His woodworking skills and his strong work ethic combined to provide a path out of slavery and poverty. Boyd was permitted to accept additional work...

Our Rich History: Living along the Buffalo Highways; where would Dixie Highways be without them?

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune If you were to take a moment and think, who would you say originally built the Northern Kentucky stretch of the Dixie Highway and Ohio’s SR133 in Clermont County? I’ll give you a hint, it was the same group. If you guessed Native Americans or the pioneers, you’d be wrong. The correct answer would be. . .buffalo. Like so many roads in Northern Kentucky and...

Our Rich History: Casualties of Siege of Cincinnati, 1862; celebrations as Confederates withdrew

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune In September 1862, Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith sent General Henry Heth with an advance force of over 6,000 to probe the defenses protecting Covington and Cincinnati. He was unprepared for the size and scope of what awaited them. Cincinnati managed to mobilize a force around 85,000 strong to man the gun emplacements and rifle pits that were dug on...

Our Rich History: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and our region; a remarkable legacy, visionary leader

This column originally appeared on April 3, 2018. It is reprinted here to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune In 1968, I was only eight years old. Yet my parents, my teachers, my uncle, and newspaper and television journalists made me acutely aware that I was living through one of the most momentous eras in US history. Four years before, when I was just...

Our Rich History: 19th Century death — photography, mementos, black crepe, professional mourners. . .

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune While loss of a loved one is always a tragic event, grieving survivors seemed to take things to the extreme throughout the course of the nineteenth century. The 1800s were a time of great technological advances, yet still filled with mystery and superstition in regard to death. Middendorf Brothers and Co. Undertakers, Pike Street, Covington, Kentucky, 1880s....