A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Kentuckians warned that massive dust cloud from Sahara Desert could make weekend air quality poor

Kentucky Department for Public Health Commissioner Dr. Steven Stack warned Kentuckians that air quality in the state may be poor this weekend and into next week. An enormous cloud of dry and dusty air that originated over the Sahara Desert will move across the southern United States over the next three to seven days. “We absolutely need to be cautious this weekend and next week, monitor the air quality...

Newport celebrates opening of Bridgeview Box Park, Riverfront Commons Pedestrian Bridge on Saturday

As part of its redevelopment of Newport on the Levee, the multi-level retail and entertainment destination fronting the Ohio River, local real estate company North American Properties (NAP) is celebrating the grand opening of Bridgeview Box Park and the new Riverfront Commons Pedestrian Bridge. Both the Box Park and pedestrian trail enhance connectivity and pedestrian energy at Newport on the Levee...

Alexandria native Jacob Greer returns from seven-month deployment aboard floating city at sea

By Megan Brown Navy Office of Community Outreach A 2017 Campbell County High School graduate returned home June 16, marking the end of a seven-month deployment aboard USS Harry S. Truman. Airman Jacob Greer, an Alexandria native, is an air traffic controller aboard the carrier. Since departing its homeport of Norfolk in November 2019, the aircraft carrier sailed in the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Mediterranean...

Kids Count Data Book highlights areas of continued need as state aims toward recovery from pandemic

Kentucky ranks 37th in the nation in overall child well-being, according to the latest edition of the KIDS COUNT® Data Book, released this week by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Kentucky’s measurable, but still inadequate, improvements were due in part to progress across several areas of economic well-being, child health coverage, teen births, and parental employment. Though Kentucky made progress...

Kentucky by Heart: Although the stage has changed, Lexington History Museum’s ‘encore’ plays on

By Steve Flairty NKyTribune Columnist When the Lexington History Museum “left the building” in 2012, there were many who figured there would be no encore. That looked to be true when the funding soon began to dry up. But the encore did come, and it’s still playing to a highly receptive audience, even though the stage has changed. “We went through the seven stages of grief; we came through...

Our Rich History: Hillside suburb of Newport, Clifton, agreed to be annexed in 1935, in Great Depression

By Margo Warminski Special to NKyTribune Part 32 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “In the late 19th Century, improvements in transportation made it more practical to develop the hillsides. It was at this time that the city of Clifton, a hillside suburb of Newport, was developed. Clifton was incorporated in 1888 by developers who chose the site due to...

The River: A sad story of tragedy on the river at Natchez; someday perhaps a better story will be told

The riverboat captain is a storyteller, and Captain Don Sanders will be sharing the stories of his long association with the river — from discovery to a way of love and life. This a part of a long and continuing story. By Capt. Don Sanders Special to NKyTribune On the morning of the 13th of May, 1911, the magnolias were yet to bloom in the yard on North Union Street, although the mocking birds chattered...

Alpacas could be secret weapon against COVID-19; UK researchers say antibodies potential defense

By Elizabeth Chapin University of Kentucky Alpacas Big Boy, Blue Eyes and Emperor may hold the key to combating COVID-19. Their antibodies could offer a defense against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease. University of Kentucky College of Medicine researchers are using the special antibodies made by alpacas, called nanobodies, to help understand the novel coronavirus and potentially develop...

Catrena Bowman-Thomas: It’s Juneteenth; celebrate end of slavery and pursue meaningful ‘what’s next’

Today is Juneteenth! A holiday recognized by the state of Kentucky and many other states, Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note...

In wake of recent drownings, officials emphasize safety when swimming, boating in Kentucky waters

With the recent summer-like temperatures, many people have been getting outdoors to enjoy Kentucky’s lakes and streams. If not careful, a fun day swimming or boating can turn tragic in a matter of seconds. Conservation officers with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources investigate boating accidents and fatalities on all waterways and reservoirs throughout the state. Often, they...

Banwari Mittal: As region reopens, I love the new attitude; why we should see people being nicer

Our city is reopening and it is exhilarating to see people again — on restaurant patios and on our sidewalks on Greenup, Mainstrasse Village, and elsewhere in Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati. It is nice to see people reconnecting with our city life but even more joyful is to see them reconnecting with other people in new ways — more courteous, friendlier, and eager to help strangers. Forced...

Five N. Kentuckians among 45 from across state selected for Leadership Kentucky Class of 2020

Leadership Kentucky, one of the oldest and most prestigious statewide leadership development programs in the United States, has announced the members of the Leadership Kentucky Class of 2020. Fernando Figueroa Among the members are Dr. Fernando Figueroa, President and CEO of Gateway Community & Technical College, Jason Payne, Senior Vice President, Republic Bank, Justin Otto, Newport on the Levee,...

Kentucky by Heart: Stories behind names of high schools reveal unique look at Kentucky’s past

By Steve Flairty NKyTribune columnist While recently looking over information about public high schools in Kentucky, it occurred to me that a lot of them are not named after their locations. Most are, however, with one example being in Pike County, where there is “Pike County Central High School” and “Phelps High School” (among others in the county). Both indicate locations with their names. But...

Our Rich History: Organizing for Action: Women’s suffrage in Northern Kentucky, Part 2

By Paul Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 31 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020,” and Part 2 of our series: “Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky.” See Part 1 of our women’s rights series: “Organizing for Action: Women’s Suffrage in Northern Kentucky” In 1888, the newly-founded Kentucky Equal Rights Association (KERA)...

The River: A sad/happy farewell as the CLYDE is sold and the Captain is a boatman without a boat

The riverboat captain is a storyteller, and Captain Don Sanders will be sharing the stories of his long association with the river — from discovery to a way of love and life. This a part of a long and continuing story. By Capt. Don Sanders Special to NKyTribune I’m about to move on to the next, possibly final, phase in life. The Rafter CLYDE, my last physical connection to the river, sold last...