A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

New mobile clinic rolls across state to deliver children’s services to underserved areas

By Hilary Brown University of Kentucky Far too often, children and teens can’t get to Lexington to get the specialized care they need. With the new mobile clinic, the providers at Kentucky Children’s Hospital will bring the care to them. Funded by grants from the Colonel Harland Sanders Foundation and the Coaches for the Kids Foundation, and supported by gifts from other generous donors, the mobile...

Your health: Don’t wait until the New Year to prioritize health, start with these tips for happier holidays

The holiday season is often a period consumed with over-indulgence and guilt. But with a few simple dietary tweaks, you can have your cake and eat it too. Physician and New York Times best-selling author, Dr. Michael Greger, shares his top evidence-based health tips for the season from NutritionFacts.org: Dr. Michael Greger   • Go for a daily walk outside or on a treadmill. Getting in more steps...

St. E. Healthy Headlines: People with diabetes focus on blood sugar levels, for children it’s harder

By Corinne Holmes St. Elizabeth Healthcare People with diabetes work hard to keep their blood sugar levels steady throughout the day by balancing diet, physical activity and medication like insulin. But for children with Type 1 diabetes, several factors can affect their blood sugar levels, and they and their parents need to plan accordingly, say the experts at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund. Those...

St. E Healthy Headlines: ‘Jumper’s knee,’ can sideline an athlete; can be prevented with proper training, rest

St. Elizabeth Healthcare You may have never heard of jumper’s knee, or patellar tendinitis, but it is one of the most common knee injuries that can sideline an athlete. Athletes who do multiple sports, such as soccer and basketball, are at high risk for developing the injury. Kathy Boehmer PT, MHS, SCS, ATC, Specialty Program Coordinator Sports Medicine, for St. Elizabeth Healthcare, says not only...

Dr. O’dell Owens, distinguished physician and public health advocate, dies suddenly at age 74

Staff report Dr. O’dell Owens, former president and CEO of Interact for Health, died suddenly Wednesday at the age of 74. Owens served as Hamilton County Coroner in 2004, becoming the first African American to serve in an executive office in the county’s history. In 2010, he became president of Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. He oversaw the opening of a satellite campus...

As concerns about listeria return to the headlines, here’s what to know about infection and food recalls

By Dr. Sarah D’Orazio University of Kentucky Listeria is in the news again – sometimes you’re warned against a particular brand of ice cream or bags of fresh produce. This time around, it’s deli meat. Public health officials will raise the alarm about an infection called listeriosis. But what is listeriosis, and how harmful is it? Sliced deli meats have been a major source of the latest round...

There is no vaccine to protect against hepatitis C, getting tested could save your life

By Dr. Takako Schaninger University of Kentucky The hepatitis vaccines you receive as a child don’t protect you from getting hepatitis C, a serious disease that can have fatal consequences including liver damage, cirrhosis and liver cancer. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver most often caused by three viruses: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C. (Photo...

UK College of Medicine offering precision nutrition, culinary medicine elective to medical students

By Lindsay Travis University of Kentucky “For some reason, I really wanted fruit or savory food when I was going through treatment. Spicy, savory, salty food — that helped with my appetite,” recalls University of Kentucky chemistry doctoral student Yueming “Ronnie” Wu. Back in 2020, he received an advanced colorectal cancer diagnosis at the age of 27. Wu went through six months of biweekly...

Kentucky first to offer pharmacist-led colorectal cancer screening via non-invasive test

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today The first pharmacist-led colorectal cancer screening via a non-invasive stool-based test in the nation, took place at Capital Pharmacy & Medical Equipment in Frankfort this week making Kentucky the first state to offer the procedure. “Pharmacists are an integral part of the healthcare delivery system in prevention, public health issues, and the dispensing of life-saving...

Latest data from state Dept. of Public Health shows big improvement in COVID community levels

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today Data released Friday by the Kentucky Department for Public Health shows a vast improvement in COVID-19 Community Levels, which are low in the majority of the state with a limited area showing a medium level. The COVID Community Levels map, which is generated from data compiled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC; rates counties as having a low,...

Gov. Beshear gives update on influenza, RSV, COVID-19 and monkeypox, says stay up-to-date on vaccines

In his weekly press conference, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), COVID-19 and monkeypox in the Commonwealth. The governor recommended that Kentuckians stay up to date with their vaccines and boosters, wash their hands frequently and stay home if they are sick. Beshear said influenza is spreading widely in Kentucky at this time. One influenza death...

Kentucky Youth Advocates release ’22 Kids Count data book, and the challenges become clearer

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today Kentucky Youth Advocates released its 2022 Kids Count data book on Wednesday, with 16 measures of child well-being, showing whether outcomes for children across the state have improved, worsened, or stayed the same over a five-year period. “Kentucky’s kids have withstood some hard knocks through the pandemic, as well as deadly tornadoes and flooding, yet they...

Beshear signs executive order allowing Kyians with severe medical conditions to legally use cannabis

In an effort to reduce Kentuckians’ reliance on addictive opioids and to provide them relief from pain, Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday said that starting next year, Kentuckians with certain severe medical conditions and who meet specific requirements will be able to possess and use small amounts of legally purchased medical cannabis to treat their medical conditions. In an executive order, the Governor...

USDEA’s national Drug Take Back Day collected over 34,000 pounds of medications over three states

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says communities across the country continued support for DEA’s biannual National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, by safely disposing of more than 647,000 pounds of unneeded medications at nearly 5,000 collection sites across the country. In the Louisville Division, which covers Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia, over 34,000...

If you are diabetic, studies warn to be aware of the threat of higher rate of hearing loss; here are tips

By Abbie McKinney Beltone Florence November is National Diabetes Month, and surprising to many – hearing loss is a prevalent comorbidity linked to the disease. Among multiple studies, researchers have discovered a higher rate of hearing loss in people with diabetes. Using tests that measure participants’ ability to hear at the low, mid and high-frequencies in both ears, the results indicate a link...