A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: Retrospect and Vista II – Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021

By Raymond G. Hebert Special to NKyTribune Part 1 of our series, “Retrospect and Vista II”: Thomas More College/University, 1971-2021. Thomas More University, which previously was called Villa Madonna College (1921-1968) and Thomas More College (1968-2018), will be celebrating its Centennial during the 2021-2022 academic year. The Centennial’s celebration events will begin in Fall 2021 during...

Our Rich History: Honoring Cincinnati’s German regiments who heeded the call during the Civil War

By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune When the Civil War broke out, Cincinnati’s Germans heeded President Lincoln’s call to arms, and enthusiastically supported the Union cause by forming several all-German regiments. Members of the 28th Ohio Infantry Regiment. (Photo provided) German immigrants and their offspring opposed slavery in a country they called “das Land der unbegrenzten...

Our Rich History: Dueling with Demons — Depression, debt, and deluge in Newport, 1873-1896

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 74 of the series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” The national economic depression that began in 1873 had far-reaching effects on American cities. In Newport, Kentucky’s case, however, the timing of the depression was worse than for many other municipalities. In 1873, the city had completed its new water works, at a vast...

Our Rich History: Misplaced priorities and missed opportunities, Newport’s Long Depression, 1873-1896

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to KyForward Part 73 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Have you ever found yourself feeling powerless? Surrounded by technology that seems to be pushing you aside? Led by unethical people with no backbone? Smack in the middle of a situation where all the least sustainable solutions to problems suffocated all of the really good...

Our Rich History: West Newport is thriving; surge of longtime, newer residents unite with shared vision

By Josh Tunning Special to NKyTribune Part 72 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Newport, Kentucky has a colorful and exciting past. From its first settlement by James Taylor, to its industrialization in the 1800s, to its Sin City days, and, finally, to what it is today, Newport is a vibrant and growing urban community. More recently, there is one neighborhood...

Our Rich History: Kentucky inventors, entrepreneurs, innovations; free workshop at NKU’s Grant Center

By John Schlipp Special to NKyTribune Kentucky is famous for its Bourbon, the Kentucky Derby, horse breeding, and historic tourist sites such as Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill. Yet the Bluegrass state also contributes its fair share of entrepreneurial and inventive commercial activity. This was affirmed recently by Site Selection magazine (Volume 66, Issue 2, March 2021, pages 67, 86), an industry...

Our Rich History: Judge Nippert’s talk with Kaiser Wilhelm II; Wiedemann of Newport supported relief

By Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune Part 71 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” On 23 July 1916, the New York Times carried a lengthy article: “A Two-Hour Talk with the Kaiser: Judge A.K. Nippert Brings Message to President Wilson and the American People from Wilhelm II.” Nippert (1872-1956), Judge of the Common Pleas Court of Cincinnati, had...

Our Rich History: Julia F. Gould of Newport, a well-known prima donna, is now largely forgotten

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 70 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Possessing a beautiful mezzo soprano voice, classically trained Julia F. Gould of Newport, Kentucky, was a consummate musician. She could play the piano, sing, and act. Hers was a promising career, featuring musical studies in Europe, and national tours with two important...

Our Rich History: The greatest watch works in the world: Newport’s lost industrial opportunity

By Alan F. Garratt Special to NKyTribune Part 69 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” In the 1880s, Newport, Kentucky was on the cusp of being the watchmaking capital of the world. It already boasted the “Largest Watch Case Factories on the Globe,” according to its founder John C. Dueber. The story of what caused him to move away from Newport and build...

Our Rich History: 1915 storm – with winds, rains – wrecked buildings, but not spirit of Newporters

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 68 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” Wednesday, July 7, 1915, was a rather typical summer day in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The Cincinnati Post weather forecast predicted “showers and thunderstorms in this vicinity tonight and Thursday without much change in temperature.” With temperatures expected...

Our Rich History: Newport once had the region’s healthiest water supply — and led to its growth

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 67 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink!” This old saying would have aptly described the water supply of Cincinnati and Covington for most of the 1800s, at least in terms of modern health standards. Slaughterhouses and factories in the area dumped their waste...

Our Rich History: Cathedral Basilica window commemorates Pius IX and Ineffabilis Deux

By Stephen Enzweiler Special to the NKyTribune
 For decades, visitors and faithful alike have filed through the north doors of the Cathedral Basilica on their way to mass, confession, to pray at adoration, or perhaps celebrate a wedding. But high above them, patiently silent and framed in mortar and stone tracery, is a stained-glass window unlike any other in the Cathedral Basilica. It tells the...

Our Rich History: Batty about Cincinnati: Reds’ fans and their hometown team — what a team!

By John Schlipp Special to NKyTribune “The whole town’s batty, about Cincinnati,
 What a team, what a team, what a team, Each man and lady—from one to eighty, How they scream, how they scream, how they scream.” “The Whole Town’s Batty About Cincinnati” – Larry Vincent, 1961 These humorous lyrics are part of a Reds’ home team anthem composed by Larry...

Our Rich History: Building bridges, ending monopolies — Newport commuters

by Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 66 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” The opening of the Covington and Cincinnati suspension bridge in January 1867 marked the beginning of an era that witnessed a new metropolitan identity for Cincinnati, Covington and Newport. In addition, the construction of streetcar lines, tying the three cities together,...

Our Rich History: ‘Connecting the dots’ between Cincinnati, Covington and Newport

By Paul Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune Part 65 of our series, “Resilience and Renaissance: Newport, Kentucky, 1795-2020.” “Connecting the dots” is probably something all of us are familiar with. Children’s magazines, restaurant placemats, puzzles, and even school assignments often utilize “connect the dots” exercises to both entertain and teach children. However, “connecting the dots”...