A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Marsy’s Law for KY launches advertising campaign for only constitutional amendment on the ballot

Marsy’s Law for Kentucky, an organization supporting equal rights for crime victims, launched a substantial statewide television advertising campaign encouraging voters to support the lone constitutional amendment on Kentucky’s ballot this November.

The campaign includes a series of ads educating Kentuckians on the need for Marsy’s Law.
 
The first series of ads is titled “One Day” and focuses on a common experience and fear of many victims who come face-to-face with their attacker without warning.
 
“Crime victims who are trying to move on with their lives should not have to live in fear of coming across their assailant at the grocery store or gas station,” said Ashlea Christiansen, Marsy’s Law for Kentucky State Director. “I urge all Kentuckians to vote YES on November 6th to change the lives of crime victims.”
 
Marsy’s Law will be the only constitutional amendment on Kentucky’s ballot this year and is widely supported by an extensive list of victims’ advocacy organizations, law enforcement officers, elected officials along with thousands of individual Kentuckians. Marsy’s Law was also the first bill to pass the Kentucky General Assembly in 2018, with bipartisan support in both chambers.
 
“A victim is a victim not by any choice of their own. Kentuckians who find themselves in this situation must navigate a criminal justice system that has been notoriously confusing and unfriendly,” said Senate Bill Sponsor Whitney Westerfield.

“Constitutional rights are a solution to the problem. It would ensure crime victims are treated with dignity and respect equal to that of the accused. I encourage all Kentuckians to please vote YES for these commonsense rights on November 6th.”
 
Marsy’s Law is named for Marsy Nicholas, a California college student who was murdered in 1983 by her ex-boyfriend. A few days after her death, her mother and brother walked into a grocery store where they were confronted by Marsy’s accused murderer. Marsy’s family had not been notified that he had been released on bail. 
 
The law would amend Kentucky’s constitution to ensure crime victims have the right to a voice in the judicial process, the right to be present in judicial hearings and the right to be made aware of upcoming hearings or changes in their offenders’ status, among others.

Kentucky is one of only a handful of states without constitutional-level rights for victims of crime.

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One Comment

  1. My wife and I support Marsy’s Law, but we also strongly support a return of voting rights to convicted felons who have served their time.

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