A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Our Rich History: Vic Canfield and others preserving Covington, helping the past come alive today

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune This is first in a series on the preservation and revitalization of Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati. If you’re interested in having your restoration or building project included in this series, please contact the Our Rich History editor, Dr. Paul Tenkotte, at tenkottep@nku.edu Canfield If you’ve visited Covington, Kentucky recently, you probably noticed...

The River: More adventures; loving the captain for making a stalwart steamboatman of a young boy

The riverboat captain is a storyteller, and Captain Don Sanders will be sharing the stories of his long association with the river — from discovery to a way of love and life. The is a part of a long and continuing story. By Capt. Don Sanders Special to NKyTribune Captain Hawley, the AVALON’s First Mate and Relief Captain, also played the steam calliope mounted on the roof making an infernal musical...

The Seasons long-term care facility develops Encourager volunteers, Best Friends program

The Seasons @ Alexandria, BLC’s newest campus in Campbell County implemented their first official Volunteer Program, The Encourager. Long-term care facilities are plentiful and senior adults have more options than ever, yet at The Seasons @ Alexandria residents are fully engaged in a unique way with this new program. Erich Hayman, Administrator for The Seasons @ Alexandria said, “I have never...

Chef John Foster: Seasons press on and so do chefs; the most creative are trained as craftsmen and artists

The sun turns over again and the seasons press on. It’s summer, officially on the 21st of June, but it felt like it on and off since April. The garden sensed it long ago, and some vegetables have just disappeared for the year, waiting until the weather, and the time is right again. Chefs move on as well, sometimes beating the bushes this time of year for the first of the summer vegetables to...

Intrepid Urban Farmer: Zucchini wars have begun (hang the vine borer) and a new chapter opened

By Ginger Dawson Special to NKyTribune As many of you may know, I have spent much time, sweat and emotional anguish over the simple desire to have a successful, long-lived zucchini crop.   My fellow gardeners — is it too much to ask for? Over the years I have tried many, many techniques that have come highly recommended as tactics to fend off that hated foe of zucchini everywhere — the...

Kentucky soldier to be posthumously awarded Medal of Honor for heroic actions in WWII at D.C. ceremony

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today A highly decorated and heroic Kentucky soldier will posthumously be awarded the Medal of Honor during a White House ceremony next week for heroic actions 73 years ago during World War II. Garlin Murl Connor, who was born in Clinton County in 1919 and died in Albany at the age of 79 in 1998, will be recognized for bravery while he was a 1st lieutenant in World War II. According...

Kentucky by Heart: Katelynn Stinnett Memorial Ride, encouraging students through chess, new book

This Saturday, motorcycle bikers will once again ride across the nation for the 10th Annual Katelynn Stinnett National Memorial Ride to raise awareness of child abuse and to raise money for its victims, according to spokesperson Sheila Shain of Shepherdsville. Sheila Shain “Every day in the United States, five children are murdered by their caregivers and their survivors are further traumatized by...

Our Rich History; John Filson; first Kentucky historian, forgotten Cincinnati founder

By Steve Preston Special to the NKyTribune In his book Daniel Boone, John Mack Faragher describes John Filson as the living embodiment of Ichabod Crane.  With the image of a skinny, clumsy, colonial nerd in your mind, it might be hard to believe the accomplishments achieved by him in the rugged and dangerous landscape of pre-statehood Kentucky and frontier Ohio. John Filson John Filson helped bring...

The River: Time to head back to school, but the river beckoned and college would have to wait

By Capt. Don Sanders Special to NKyTribune The Fall Semester at Eastern Kentucky State College was within a week of beginning while the AVALON was still playing Cincinnati, across the Ohio River from Covington, my hometown, so my parents, naturally, thought I would quit the crew and head back to college. The furthest up the Ohio River I had ever been was just above Lock & Dam 36, across from the...

Latonia Water Park/Splash Pad at Bill Cappel Youth Sports Complex closed for emergency repair

Electricians and Covington Public Works technicians are working furiously to fix the water filtration system at the Latonia Water Park/Splash Pad heading into what is expected to be the hottest weekend of the year.  The pool didn’t open as expected at noon Friday when employees found the pump not working. What was expected to be a relatively quick fix – the pump’s replacement –...

Chef John Foster: Bourdain’s sudden death a cause for self-reflection, his legacy filled with purpose

I’ve been asked several times in the last week to comment on the passing of Anthony Bourdain. The morning the news broke I was far too stunned to say anything, and as the week progressed and the tributes poured in, I struggled to find the words to adequately express myself. It was only after some serious self-reflection that I discovered the reason for my reticence; Chef Bourdain’s life...

Local teen author Lauren Hudson to sign ‘The Deception’ at locations in NKY, at Colonel De Friday

It seems the only teenagers busier than Lauren Hudson are the main characters in her latest novel, “The Deception” (Headline Books, Inc.). The 18-year-old Dixie Heights High School grad has spent the past year getting straight A’s, acting in her high school musical production “Grease,” competing in the National Mock Trial Championship, preparing for an internship at Cincinnati Children’s...

Lyn Hacker: A long life, well lived, did not make saying goodbye to Chief Redbird any easier

It was the worst possible combination of traits that he could have inherited – that foal I found standing wobbly, still wet, in the thick straw with Lover, his mother. An anathema to every standardbred horse person, he was bright orange, with a glaring white blaze running down his face. To put the nails in the coffin, he had four white feet. My mother, father and I had been taking eight hour foal...

The American kestrel: A little dynamo, most common falcon in North America

By Gayle Pille Special to the NKytribune American kestrels are the most common falcon in North America. They are also our smallest falcon, about the size of a blue jay. Swift and erratic flyers, kestrels are often seen hovering along the interstate and roadsides. Frequently called sparrow hawks, they will sometimes eat sparrow-sized birds, though more frequently it’s crickets, grasshoppers, snakes...

Kentucky by Heart: Positive experiences at Camp Ernst leave lasting memories for thousands

I recently attended, as an alumnus, a celebration of the 90th anniversary of the YMCA Camp Ernst camp near Burlington in Boone County. I participated at the camp for only one summer, in 1972, as a cabin counselor, but my memories are vivid and positive. The rich experiences of working with children during that short time helped prepare me for teaching elementary students for several decades. Over the...