A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Kentucky by Heart: Diverse sampling of stories best illustrate, explain life in the Blue Grass state

By Steve Flairty NKyTribune columnist In last week’s Kentucky by Heart, I shared a virtual tour of Kentucky via the books I have on the shelves in The Kentucky Room, which is another name for my personal writing room at my home in Versailles. My focus was on some noted authors from the state, and for whom their books are ones I most aggressively collect, including: Wendell Berry, David Dick, Thomas...

Lyn Hacker: Musicial dynamo John Heinrich takes lifetime accomplishments, creates Songwriter Demo

So you’ve given vent to that incessant string of words that has been rattling around in your brain for some time. You’ve actually sat down and written the words out (when no one was looking). Now that they are before you, they seem alone and naked. You realize there are other thoughts and words coming, so you add them, and before you know it, you’ve written at least a semblance of a poem and...

Our Rich History: Alms and Doepke in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine was second largest store west of NYC

By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to NKyTribune My parents used to speak of the old Alms and Doepke department store at 222 East Central Parkway in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. It was a mammoth establishment, at its height encompassing 15 acres of floor space, once the second-largest store west of New York City and the largest in Cincinnati. By 1904, historian Charles Greve, in his Centennial...

Covington’s Braxton Brewing Co. offering live You Knew Me When duo, advancing a new album

After uprooting from their Nashville home and full-time jobs in June of 2012, the husband and wife indie folk-rock duo You Knew Me When set plans to tour the nation for a full year — however, they never stopped. Since that time they have been serving up their craft brewed compositions, a term coined from their over 140 craft brewery performances, coast to coast throughout the USA and into...

Gayle Pille: No shortage of squirrels in Northern Kentucky — where there are trees, there are squirrels

Black Squirrel by Gayle Pille Kentucky is home to four different species of squirrels – the Southern Flying Squirrel, Red Squirrel, Eastern Gray Squirrel, and Eastern Fox Squirrel. Flying Squirrels are nocturnal and seldom seen; while one must head east to the Appalachians to see Red Squirrels. However, there is no shortage of Gray and Fox Squirrels in Northern Kentucky. Where there are trees,...

Chef Foster: Never underestimate the importance of good prep work for excellent results in the kitchen

Food in general can be a very contemplative idea to consider. On a wide scale it is fraught with all sort of connotation, subtext, innuendo and opinion. Food can range from being apolitical to rabidly partisan and in many cases it can divide regions of the country and connected families that live in those regions. We write columns, form social networks, write blogs and review (sometimes for pay)...

Bluegrass & Backroads: Former Marine inspired to create new fishing lure — one with a heartbeat

Meet Marine veteran Brian von Plueren, who motivated by his injuries, created a highly successful fishing lure that was different. It has a heartbeat. Find out about Von’s Old Ticker. Kentucky is a state defined by its history and noted for a number of things, not the least of which is horse racing, bourbon, bluegrass music and barbecue. But, as natives Bob Shrader and Matt Hilton remind us...

Jamie Vaught: Hillbilly Elegy, sports memoirs among recommended non-fiction books for winter reading

This is the first of a two-part series on recently-published nonfiction books. Spring is still more than a month away and it’s likely there is still some cold weather in our future. Here are a few non-fiction books you might enjoy reading around the fire. –“Lucky Bastard: My Life, My Dad and the Things I’m Not Allowed To Say on TV” by Joe Buck (Dutton, $28) is a candid and humorous...

Kentucky by Heart: Writing room provides many opportunities for virtual trips, enriching experiences

By Steve Flairty NKyTribune columnist My sweet spot for leisurely travel destinations is almost always centered within the state of Kentucky. I don’t feel deprived at all in saying so about what might seem to be such modest expectations; Kentucky is a special place that I can both enjoy and feel a sense of pride as I travel it. Call me simple in tastes, but it won’t matter a bit to me. There’s...

Our Rich History: Kentucky Governor-elect William Goebel is nation’s only assassinated governor

By Andrew Young Special to NKyTribune On January 30, 1900, the Senate and House of Kentucky met together in a state of extreme emergency. The governor-elect, William Goebel, was teetering on the brink of death. The legislators, feeling it was only just and right, hurried to officially proclaim him governor before he passed on (which might be at any moment). They sought to give him the honor that someone...

Independence artist Timothy Gold among 24 whose work is included in ‘Kentucky Visions at the Capitol’

The work of 24 Kentucky artists, including Timothy Gold of Kenton, graces the hallways of the Capitol Annex. The Kentucky Arts Council exhibit “Kentucky Visions at the Capitol” will be on display 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, from Feb. 7 through March 31 at the Annex. The exhibit features 58 individual pieces by Kentucky Crafted artists and Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship recipients. “Longtime...

Chef Foster: It’s a dietary staple, but the question remains — just what is a mushroom?

What is a mushroom exactly? That was a real question uttered by one of my culinary students at Sullivan University. On its face it is a startlingly simple question and one which should require a sentence or two to answer. But considered more thoughtfully it has produced thousands of pages of research and opinion and spawned a huge network of mycologist chefs. From the simple (some would say bland)...

Keven Moore: A common-sense approach can go a long way to keeping you safe on the streets

As a young middle-class kid growing up in a church that had an inner city bus ministry, my father, the bus driver, volunteered my services as the official bus greeter, referee and snitch as he guided his passengers through some of Lexington’s worst neighborhoods in the 1970’s. Many of those kids needed guidance and an opportunity to escape their environment, and I am still friends with many them...

Kentucky by Heart: For many kids across the state, Summer Food Service Program is literally a lifesaver

By Steve Flairty NKyTribune columnist Valerie Knight is a big supporter of a government program that she believes is well worth the expenditures. At her position as Director of Food Services for Webster County Schools in western Kentucky, she sees poor children receive a dose of love and kindness outside the scope of the regular school year, during the summer, and it starts with nourishing food from...

Our Rich History: Charles Cist (1792-1868) was early Cincinnati historian, driven by love of area

by Don Heinrich Tolzmann Special to NKyTribune Charles Cist (1792-1868) published several books that are valuable for anyone interested in the history of Cincinnati, including: Cincinnati in 1841 (1841) and Sketches and Statistics of Cincinnati in 1859 (1859). Ohio historian Henry Howe wrote that Cist “was filled with a love of Cincinnati, and ministered to the extraordinary social fraternal feeling...