A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Beechwood teacher Amanda Klare among 24 Kentucky educators to qualify for Teacher of the Year

NKyTribune staff Beechwood Elementary School teacher Amanda Klare is one of 24 outstanding Kentucky educators to qualify for Kentucky Teacher of the Year to be announced in May. Amanda Klare The Kentucky Department of Education and Valvoline Inc. sponsor the awards whose winners are selected by a blue-ribbon panel of veteran educators. Klare created and organizes the NKyTribune’s Voices from...

Purple Heart veteran and his rescued companion Fred discuss their book at Kenton County Library

By C. Nate Swope Special to NKyTribune Outside friends played and families picnicked across the Bluegrass state as cheery scattered clouds and a cool seasonal draft commenced the start of spring. Wonderful weather to take the dog out for a walk. Marine Veteran Craig Grossi and Fred-the-Afghan at Kenton County Public Library in Erlanger. (Photo by: C. Nate Swope) Inside Kenton County Library in Erlanger,...

NKY Chamber to reopen Roebling Suspension Bridge with Derby Trifecta Crawl to boost local businesses

By Ryan Clark NKyTribune reporter Emily Stretch remembers what Opening Day was like this year. She and the others who work at Keystone Bar & Grill on Greenup Street should have had crowds of people partying and having a good time. But there wasn’t a lot of partying going on. Instead, the big crowds were across the river. “That was not fun,” says Stretch, who has worked as a manager at Keystone...

Our Rich History: ‘Appearance of a Town of Some Respectability’ — part two on 18th-Century Cincinnati

Part two of a series. By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune The relationship between civilians and the military in Cincinnati was so bad that in May 1793, when General Anthony Wayne arrived with 1,000 troops to fight the Indians, he refused to garrison the fort. Instead, he set up a military camp near the mouth of Mill Creek, about a mile south and west of the fort. He called it “Hobson’s Choice.”...

The River: A young man becomes a ‘captain’ and takes the Delta Queen from Cincinnati to New Orleans

The riverboat captain is a storyteller, and Captain Don Sanders will be sharing the stories of his long association with the river — from discovery to a way of love and life. The is a part of a long and continuing story. By Capt. Don Sanders Special to NKyTribune The AVALON rounded-to abreast Natchez-Under-the-Hill and slid into the sand below the cement ramp extending into the river at the foot...

NKyTribune’s Gene Clabes among those named to UK journalism’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni

NKyTribune Associate Editor and co-founder Gene Clabes is among nine journalists who will be inducted into the University of Kentucky School of Journalism’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni Thursday evening. The alumni to be recognized in addition to Clabes include an widely recognized photographer for National Geographic, a popular and beloved Courier- Journal columnist; the editor of the newspaper...

New Education Commission forces resignation of Dr. Stephen Pruitt during a special meeting on Tuesday

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today The Kentucky Board of Education, with new members appointed by Gov. Matt Bevin in place, voted to accept the forced resignation of Education Commissioner Dr. Stephen Pruitt during a special board meeting on Tuesday.   Pruitt has been commissioner since September 2015. Bevin made it clear Tuesday before the board’s vote he was unhappy with the state’s recent...

Don Owen: CovCath’s Mayer pursued by colleges galore, but ‘Alexander the Great’ is still No. 1

Given the prestigious college offers Michael Mayer has already received, it’s a safe assumption the Covington Catholic High School football prodigy will go down as one of the most highly recruited players in Northern Kentucky history. Notre Dame, Alabama, Ohio State, LSU and Nebraska are among the schools that are hoping to sign the multitalented Mayer, a 6-foot-5, 215-pound tight end. It’s not...

Our Rich History: 18th Century Cincinnati — ‘The Appearance of a Town of Some Respectability’

By Steve Preston Special to NKyTribune Cincinnati in its early years was not the cultured “Queen City” we know today. It was the tip of the spear in regards to the settlement of Ohio and the Old Northwest. With the 1783 signing of the Treaty of Paris, America won her independence and doubled in size. John Cleves Symmes (Source: Charles Greve, Centennial History of Cincinnati (Chicago, IL: Biographical...

The River: AVALON on the way downriver, picks up some guests, and later a canoe, skiff race ensues

The riverboat captain is a storyteller, and Captain Don Sanders will be sharing the stories of his long association with the river — from discovery to a way of love and life. The is a part of a long and continuing story. By Captain Don Sanders Special to NKyTribune Right about lunchtime, a day, or so, before the AVALON left Memphis and continued downriver, two tanned, muscular young men in a canoe...

Our Rich History 1968: Riots erupt in Cincinnati following assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Part 2 of a continuing series on the 50th anniversary of one of America’s great watershed years, 1968.  By Paul A. Tenkotte Special to the NKyTribune In last week’s column, we reviewed the life and Cincinnati connections of one of our nation’s greatest Civil Rights leaders, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  He was a courageous man committed to nonviolence, a visionary who strove for peace among...

The River: Downbound, entering Mark Twain’s Lower Mississippi and falling in love with ‘Father of Waters’

The riverboat captain is a storyteller, and Captain Don Sanders will be sharing the stories of his long association with the river — from discovery to a way of love and life. The is a part of a long and continuing story. By Capt. Don Sanders Special to NKyTribune Passing Cairo Point, downbound, the AVALON entered a different river – the Lower Mississippi – an incompatible beast of a stream...

Bookmobiles alive and kicking in Kentucky which has more than any other state; 75 are on the road

By Jen Fifield Pew Research Center The van comes to a stop just as it reaches the hens. A bleating lamb is the first to greet Sandra Hennessee as she opens the van door and lets in the midday sun. To get here, on an Amish farm in rural western Kentucky, Hennessee headed west from the small town of Mayfield and drove for miles on a two-lane road, passing churches, farms and open fields. With every bend...

Horizon Community Funds, Kentucky Philanthropy Initiative offering ‘Power in Numbers;’ sign up here

Horizon Community Funds of Northern Kentucky and the Kentucky Philanthropy Initiative have announced details for the April 17 Power in Numbers symposium, to be held at the St. Elizabeth Technology and Education Center in Erlanger from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. that day. Power in Numbers will focus on a recent study addressing the significant Transfer of Wealth taking place in Northern Kentucky, and the...

This Week in Frankfort: $22 billion biennial budget to Governor; adoption, foster care, road plan bills pass

This week, lawmakers fulfilled a main duty the state constitution requires of them as final approval was given to a state budget that will guide more than $22 billion worth of spending over the next two years. The budget plan does not include all of the program cuts that received much attention when they were unveiled in the governor’s original budget plan. Rather, lawmakers approved a tax measure...